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Quebec spending millions to improve health care access for Anglos

As promised in the spring budget, the provincial government is spending $6.9 million to improve access to health care for anglophones and to help other anglophone groups.

Kathleen Weil, the Minister responsible for Relations with English-Speaking Quebecers, detailed on Tuesday how the money will be spent: $5.7 million for community groups that work with anglophones, and $400,000 each to the English Language Art Network (ELAN), Seniors Action Quebec, and Literacy Quebec.

Those funds will be spent over the next three years to help the organizations expand upon their core functions.

Watch interview with Minister Kathleen Weil

 

Liberals Pledge $7 Million in New Money for Anglos

  • $5.7 million will go to the Community Health and Social Services Network (CHSSN), which will transfer the money to local organization with mandates to strengthen community development and health care.
  • $400,000 will go to Literacy Quebec (LQ), which works to empower local literacy centers across the province.
  • $400,000 will go to Seniors Action Quebec (SAQ) to provide services to seniors in English
  • $400,000 will go to the English Language Art Network (ELAN) to help build momentum for Quebec’s English-speaking artists.

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Quebec pledges $7 million for anglophone groups

The Quebec government is giving nearly $7 million in financial aid to organizations that work with anglophone communities in order for them to diversify and expand their offerings.

The bulk of the funding will go toward the Community Health and Social Services network, which will receive $5.7 million over three years. It will distribute 93 per cent of the funds to 25 local and regional organizations that it co-ordinates. In addition, the English Language Arts Network (ELAN), Seniors Action Québec and Literacy Quebec will receive $400,000 each over three years, read a press release from the secretariat that was issued in French only.

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Minister responsible for anglos meets with English seniors’ groups

The minister responsible for relations with English-speaking Quebecers met with leaders from more than a dozen Montreal seniors’ groups Friday to hear their concerns.

Kathleen Weil acknowledged that English-speaking seniors require some adapted public services. Weil and the head of the English-language secretariat have toured the province to gather data on minorities, including information about anglophone seniors. This data will be used to create a new government action plan.

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QCGN launches most up-to-date, detailed portrait of Quebec’s English-speaking seniors

Montreal – October 6, 2014

The Quebec Community Groups Network today released the most up-to-date and detailed portrait of English-speaking seniors in Quebec. “Moving Forward – Building research capacity related to Quebec’s English speaking seniors”, which was supported by the Quebec English-Speaking Communities Research Network (QUESCREN) at Concordia University, presents the data collected during a three-year participatory research project where seniors helped define the topics of concern and carry out the research and disseminate the findings.

“Quebec’s English-speaking seniors represent 25.4 per cent of Quebec’s English-speaking community, yet they have been aging without the benefit of policies and programs that acknowledge their particular situation as a linguistic minority,” commented QCGN President Dan Lamoureux, noting this will be an important tool in advocating for seniors.

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English-speaking Seniors Unite to Create Provincial Voice

Montreal – November 19, 2013

English-speaking seniors, community partners, government officials from all government levels as well as the Commissioner of Official Languages gathered in Montreal today for the official launch of Seniors Action Quebec, a new provincial network for English-speaking seniors that plans to provide a provincial voice that will influence program and policy change to address the needs of Quebec’s English-speaking seniors.

“There are many issues confronting all seniors in Quebec, and especially English-speaking seniors who are uniquely affected because they are  less bilingual than younger generations and the fact that many of their children have moved away to pursue job opportunities or education,” said Seniors Action Quebec President David Cassidy. “This removes a major source of support for English-speaking seniors and means they must rely upon friends or government services to meet their needs.”

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