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Anglo rights group gets first sit-down with the premier to hash out concerns

The Quebec Community Groups Network got to take the concerns of the English community to the premier Friday at a private meeting. It was a rare opportunity so early in a new government’s mandate. “We’ve never met a premier of Quebec this early in his mandate or her mandate,” said QCGN President Geoffrey Chambers.

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Anglo rights’ group pushes issues in meeting with Quebec Premier

Quebec Premier François Legault met with members of the Quebec Community Groups Network on Friday for a closed-door meeting. As Global’s Tim Sargeant reports, issues discussed included the future of school boards, access to English education and wearing of religious symbols.

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QCGN honours French immersion pioneers

Murielle Parkes and Olga Melikoff, two of the parents who pushed more than 50 years ago to establish French immersion in St. Lambert, are getting recognition for their efforts with a prize from the Quebec Community Groups Network.

Listen to the interview on a All in a Weekend Montreal with Ainslie MacLellan

Quebec ban on religious symbols would be ‘catastrophic’: anglo groups

Disturbing, disruptive, divisive, catastrophic.

Those are some of the words the head of a network of Quebec anglophone groups used Friday to describe the incoming Coalition Avenir Québec government’s plan to ban the wearing of religious symbols on the job by public employees in positions of authority.

Under Premier-designate François Legault’s proposed new law, which he said Friday he would try to get passed in his first year, elementary and high school teachers, police officers, prosecutors, judges and prison guards would have to remove their Muslim hijab, Jewish kippa or Sikh turban or lose their jobs.

“If they actually did it, it would be catastrophic, seriously tearing the community apart,” Geoffrey Chambers, president of the Quebec Community Groups Network, told the Montreal Gazette.

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Surprise : English is an official language of Quebec

Quebec’s quiet certitudes were troubled on the morning of August 23 when the Québec Solidaire party published on its website the following sentence: “English is an official language of Quebec and Canada.” Horrors!

The consternation was compounded when the party’s co-spokesperson, Manon Massé, repeated the heresy, in English, in a tweet, and then, after launching the party’s election campaign that afternoon before the press, she replied, in French, to a reporter’s question: “Currently, because we are still in Canada, English is an official language in Quebec. What I’m saying is that Québec Solidaire is a sovereignist party, pro-independence, which, in its first mandate, will launch the process of Quebec’s independence and, in that Quebec, for Québec Solidaire, French is the official language.”

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Cabinet Shuffle Blurs Roles and Could Delay Implementation of Action Plan for Official Languages

Montreal – July 18, 2018 – The Quebec Community Groups Network congratulates Minister Mélanie Joly, who moves to Tourism, maintains the Official Languages file, and was assigned responsibility for La Francophonie. We also commend Pablo Rodriguez, the new Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism. However, the QCGN is concerned that the cabinet shuffle blurs roles and may create confusion about who is responsible and accountable for Official Languages.

“The Government of Canada has just made a major commitment to Official Languages through its Action Plan for Official Languages – 2018-2023: Investing in Our Future, so we are rightfully concerned about ensuring clear lines of accountability related to the coordination of its implementation,” said QCGN President Geoffrey Chambers. He noted that official language organizations are worried the shuffle will impede the rollout of additional resources allocated for Official Languages through Canadian Heritage.

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Léger poll conducted for the Association of Canadian Studies and QCGN: Multiculturalism versus Interculturalism: Myth and Reality

June 27,  marks Canadian Multiculturalism Day. In Quebec, policy-makers and intellectuals have since the introduction of federal multicultural policy expressed much ambivalence about multiculturalism and over the since the 1990’s have insisted that Quebec rejects multiculturalism and rather promotes interculturalism. It suggests that interculturalism promotes interaction between communities in contrast with multiculturalism that purportedly promotes ethnic specificity. Presumably the intercultural model gives rise to divergent approaches to newcomer adaptation with a more integrationist and less accommodation of cultural difference. In this third part of the series on difference and similarity in views between Quebec francophone and anglophone we look at issues of immigration, diversity and accommodation. As we observe the results point to some of the sharpest differences in attitudes. They also reveal that the independent of linguistic background, Quebecers do not see much difference between multiculturalism and interculturalism despite years of insistence that the two purported models offer distinct messages.

The survey was conducted by the firm Leger Marketing for the Association for Canadian Studies and the Quebec Community Groups Network with a national sample 1226 Quebecers 871 francophones 275 anglophones and 106 allophones and was conducted between May 14 and may 17 2018 via web panel with a probabilistic margin of error of 3.5 points 19 times out of 20.

Click here to view the PowerPoint presentation

Léger poll conducted for the Assocation of Canadian Studies and QCGN: Quebecers Attachment to Canada: One year after the 150th

The weekend of July 1 2018, marks the 151st birthday of Canada and around the country there will be celebrations of Canada Day. Last year’s 150th anniversary of Confederation saw considerable commemorative activity around July 1 although participation in Quebec remained relatively lower profile than it elsewhere in the country. It’s difficult to assess the impact of the anniversary on attachment to Canada in Quebec or elsewhere though some surveys initially suggested a boost in such feeling. One year later the Association for Canadian Studies-QCGN-Léger Marketing survey points to a pattern of continued stability in levels of attachment to Canada on the part of Quebecers and a persistent gap between francophones and non-francophones in that regard.

The survey was conducted by the firm Léger Marketing for the Association for Canadian Studies and the Quebec Community Groups Network with a national sample 1226 Quebecers 871 francophones 275 anglophones and 106 allophones and was conducted between May 14th and  may 17th  2018 via web panel with a probabilistic margin of error of 3.5 points 19 times out of 20.

Click here to view complete PowerPoint presentation

Access to Justice in English in Quebec Powerpoint presentation

PowerPoint presentation on Access to Justice in English in Quebec: Working Together to Ensure Access to Justice in English in Quebec given on Saturday, June 16 2018 at QCGN’s 23rd Annual General Meeting.

QCGN Set to Champion English-speaking Quebecers

Montreal – June 16, 2018 – Galvanized following an upbeat two-day meeting, members of the Quebec Community Groups Network emerged energized and ready to defend Quebec’s English-speaking community on both the federal and provincial fronts.

On the federal front, the hot topic was the new Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in Our Future – Ottawa’s multi-million-dollar investment strategy to support official language minority communities, including English-speaking Quebec. The plan will provide an additional $57.37 million over five years to Canadian Heritage to boost core funding for official language minority organizations as well as a new dedicated fund of $5.3 million over five years for Quebec’s English-speaking communities.

Click here to read full press release