Tag Archive for: Official Languages Act

PRODUCING REGULATIONS FOR PART VII OF THE OFFICIAL LANGUAGES ACT: ENGLISH-SPEAKING QUEBEC’S STAKE IN THE PROCESS

Part VII of Canada’s Official Languages Act ‘breathes life’ into Section 16(3) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, that permits Parliament “to advance the equality of status or use of English and French”. It outlines the Government of Canada’s commitments to this aim and lays out the duties of institutions subject to the Act to ensure these commitments are implemented.

Part VII is critical legislative lifeline between the federal government and Canada’s English and French linguistic minority communities. It is also the principal Act through which federal resources are provided to the provinces and territories to fund services in the minority language. Among other things, these investments by the federal government help fund community sector organizations and support the Government of Quebec’s funding of our school system, and the provision of health and social services in English.

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Quebec’s English-Speaking Community Leaders Blast Bill C-13 Action Plan

Announcing details of the new federal Action Plan for Official Languages, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau singles out French speakers as the only minority group in danger in Canada. “We remain concerned that the French-language charter (of Quebec) is included” in the dramatically reformulated Official Languages Act, Bill C-13, which currently incorporates Quebec’s Bill 96 and is expected to be adopted in the House of Commons, responds Eva Ludvig, president of the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN). Ludvig also expresses concern that under the Action Plan, Ottawa must negotiate with Quebec to govern allocation of the fresh federal funding: “Historically, this has not worked out well for the English-speaking community.”

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OPEN LETTER: Commons committee votes to forsake Quebec anglophones

The QCGN is profoundly disappointed that the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages has allowed references to Quebec’s Charter of the French Language to remain in proposed new federal language legislation to amend Canada’s Official Languages Act, reads an open letter from the QCGN in the Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph.

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WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A COMMON AND OFFICIAL LANGUAGE?

At the House Committee on Official Languages’ meeting on Jan, 31, 2023, a Bloc Québécois motion to insert “French as the common language of Quebec” into Canada’s Official Languages Act (OLA) was defeated. A majority of MPs on the committee studying Bill C-13, which would amend the OLA were uncomfortable with the concept of a ‘common language’ being contained in Canadian legislation.

The QCGN does not support the use of the term “common language”, which was used in Bill 96 to unilaterally amend the Constitution Act, 1867.

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Community organizations call Bill C-13 a major setback for English-speaking Quebecers

“This is a major setback for the rights of English-speaking Quebecers,” says QCGN President Eva Ludvig of the recognition of the Charter of the French Language within Bill C-13. The Standing Committee on Official Languages had rejected proposals from Liberal committee members to remove reference to the Charter in C-13, while proposals by the Bloc Québécois to further entrench the Charter into the Official Languages Act were adopted.

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Opposition blocks proposals to remove French language charter from Bill C-13

The Liberal proposal to remove mention of the Charter of the French Language from Bill C-13 was shut down in committee by opposition parties on Friday. “Despite the best efforts of many Liberal MPs led by Anthony Housefather, Patricia Lattanzio, and Marc Garneau, it is clear to us that the deck is stacked against English-speaking Quebec,” reads a statement from QCGN President Eva Ludvig.

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House of Commons Committee Votes to Forsake English-speaking Quebecers

The Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) is profoundly disappointed that the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages has allowed references to Quebec’s Charter of the French Language to remain in proposed new federal language legislation to amend Canada’s Official Languages Act.

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LANGUES OFFICIELLES : JUSTIN TRUDEAU A « CHOISI LE CAMP » DES ANGLOPHONES

With the dramatic changes proposed to the federal Official Languages Act, the language rights of the English-speaking community in Quebec are currently being treated with disdain by both the federal government and the majority francophone community in the province, Sylvia Martin-Laforge, director general of the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN), tells ONfr. Geneviève Tellier, a University of Ottawa political scientist, takes a different tack.

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QCGN Reacts to An Act to amend the Official Languages Act, to enact the Use of French in Federally Regulated Private Businesses Act

Today, Minister Petitpas Taylor’s Bill C-13, An Act to amend the Official Languages Act, to enact the Use of French in Federally Regulated Private Businesses Act and to make related amendments to other Acts, was tabled in the House of Commons. Like its predecessor C-32, an Act for the Substantive Equality of French and English and the Strengthening of the Official Languages Act, that died on the order paper before the last election, the new legislation contains some positive measures. However, it must also be acknowledged that in several areas the federal government has abandoned 50 years of commitment to the national vision of linguistic duality and equality in federal law between our official languages from sea to sea to sea.

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QCGN Highly Critical of CAQ Government’s Bill 96

Panelists suggest Trudeau’s support is motivated by ‘political calculation’

After more than a half-century of rising and falling tensions between Quebecers over the use of English and French, concerns are rising among stakeholders that some rights and protections Quebec anglophones fought for since the introduction of Bill 101 more than 40 years ago are threatened by Quebec’s proposed Bill 96 and changes to Ottawa’s Official Languages Act.

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