Posts

Quebec’s anglophone minority faces declining political clout

Many Quebec Anglophones are upset at something relatively novel: the support of their traditional allies, the federal and provincial Liberals, for Bill 96, which many English-speakers see as a violation of their rights.

In a blistering statement, Marlene Jennings, a former Liberal MP from Montreal and now president of Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN), blamed the airline executive for inflicting “lasting damage” on the anglophone community, at a time when it needs friends more than ever.

Read more

Quebec Community Groups Network Congratulates Parties for Federal Election

Montreal, September 21, 2021 – Canadians have voted, and the results from the 44th federal election
are in! The Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) wishes to thank all candidates, political parties,
and volunteers for the work they put into the election, and those who took the time to vote.

“We extend our congratulations to the Liberal Party of Canada, which will form the next minority
government, and look forward to continuing its work with all Parliamentarians to enhance the vitality of
Canada’s English linguistic minority communities and protect and promote the core national value of
linguistic duality,” said QCGN President Marlene Jennings.

Read more

Liberals’ Language Plan Promises to Protect Anglo Rights

Discussing the Liberal’s 27-point plan to protect and promote the French language on CJAD radio, QCGN President Marlene Jennings said there are good and bad ideas. Jennings said the QCGN agrees with a Liberal suggestion to have an independent language commissioner with a clear mandate and powers. However the advocacy group is less impressed with a plan to cap enrollment in CEGEPs.

Listen here

Former Quebec environment minister honoured with Goldbloom Award

Clifford Lincoln will receive one of the QCGN’s Goldbloom Award on October 26 for his contributions to Quebec’s English-speaking community. Clifford marked the provincial politics after being elected in the wake of the 1980 referendum when he resigned from Bourassa cabinet in 1989 over the premier’s decision to use the notwithstanding clause on a Supreme Court ruling favouring bilingual signs.

He moved on to federal politics, representing Lac-Saint-Louis riding from 1993 to his 2004 retirement. While Clifford Lincoln still calls Quebec home, he hopes to see reversed the trend of seeing children departing their province for a better future.

Read the article on CTV Montreal website