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Bonjour-Hi: Couillard repents, but anglo group too furious to forgive

“Accused in writing of participating in an exercise that heaped scorn on the English-speaking community, Premier Philippe Couillard has moved to patch up relations in the wake of the Bonjour-Hi debacle.”

Premier Philippe Couillard moved to patch up relations with English-speaking Quebecers in the wake of the Bonjour-Hi debacle after receiving a letter from the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN).

Sources confirmed that the letter landed in Couillard’s mail Tuesday, sparking his comments in the legislature Thursday and an unscheduled afternoon interview with Montreal radio station CJAD. During question period Couillard admitted his government underestimated the negative impact the debate would have on the English-speaking community.

Read the article on the Montreal Gazette website

Parti Québécois Leader Admits “Bonjour-Hi” Ban Was “A Trap” To Make Other Politicians Look Bad

“Jean-François Lisée, leader of the Parti Quebecois, the political party who started the “Bonjour-Hi” debacle that took over the province, revealed the party’s true intentions behind the bill to denounce the iconic bilingual greeting.”

Read the article published on MTL Blog

Bonjour-Hi: English-speakers are surprised by the debate.

“De nombreux anglophones sont surpris du débat actuel sur le «Bonjour-Hi»: ils apprécient l’expression de courtoisie — avec le français en premier — et jugent que l’Assemblée nationale devrait avoir d’autres chats à fouetter.”

Many English-speaking Quebecers are surprised by the political debate that has suddenly sprung up around a common greeting in Montreal. For some business owners, welcoming customers in both French and in English helps make tourists feel comfortable.

James Shea, president of the QCGN, notes that the bilingual greeting opens the door for communication and is a form of respect for the English-speaking minority community in Quebec.

Read the article written by the Presse Canadienne in the Journal Métro

Lisée à la conquête des communautés culturelles (FR)

“L’ancien ministre de la métropole et responsable de la communauté anglophone sous le gouvernement Marois a appris sa leçon. Maintenant qu’il est le chef des forces souverainistes et qu’il a en main un rapport d’étape Repensez le PQ, Jean-François Lisée se lance à la conquête des communautés culturelles et anglophones du Québec.”

Saying he wants to attract more cultural communities to the Parti Québécois, Jean-François Lisée was visiting Dawson College to make a speech to English-speaking students. He acknowledges the misconnection with those communities since the last referendum and he tries to make amend.

The Quebec Community Groups Network welcomes this political move, but do not think the English-speaking communities it represents will become members in a second.

Read the full article on TVA Nouvelles

Lisée says Trudeau should have broken into English; complaints rise

“As a matter of common courtesy, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau should have spoken English to Quebec anglophones, the leader of the Parti Québécois said Thursday.”

In a follow-up article to Trudeau’s language flap in Sherbrooke, Philip Authier addresses the multiple complaints that have been filed so far to the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. Parti Quebecois leader, Jean-François Lisée, comments Trudeau’s action has no grasp of reality and policy on matters of language and identity and that he sees nothing wrong with speaking English with the English-speaking community of Quebec.

James Shea, president of the QCGN, also noted the whole community has been insulted by Trudeau’s action, and that we need an apology from him. From Davos, Premier Philippe Couillard weighed in saying French may be our common language, but he answers to English-speaking Quebecers in their language.

Read the full article in the Montreal Gazette

Lisée wants to impose more French on English universities and CEGEPs

“Parti Québécois leader Jean-François Lisée wants English CEGEPs and universities to beef up their French, even proposing exit exams for graduates. As Global’s Anne Leclair reports, some worry it’s another way to make anglophones feel like outsiders.”

The debate to include stricter rules for French-language in CEGEPs dates back. If elected, Jean-François Lisée would like English institutions to add more French courses, to offer students the opportunity to do a semester in French institutions, and to make it mandatory for English students to pass a French proficiency exam. While the idea can be welcome on English campuses, adding a condition to get their diploma might challenge students graduating from those institutions.

On that note, QCGN DG Sylvia Martin-Laforge says that the PQ proposal could backfire and push more people to leave the province, the very effect Lisée wants to stop with his proposal. Adding a mandatory French exit exam could mean another hurdle for English-speaking Quebecers, comments Martin-Laforge.

To watch the interview made by Global Montreal.

Letter: QCGN continues to oppose Bill 14, but recognizes that PQ government’s outreach to anglos

The Gazette, by Dan Lamoureux 

Re: “We’ve listened to anglos on Bill 14” (Opinion, May 17)

For many, Bill 14 remains an emotional issue, and so it might be difficult to see the positive effects of the consultation process surrounding the proposed legislation. Although the Quebec Community Groups Network remains opposed to the bill — and its individual provisions — we recognize that we as English-speaking Quebecers gained greater recognition of our minority community from the government Quebec.

First, we have benefited as a community. We demonstrated that there is a vibrant English-speaking community in Quebec that is greater than the sum of its individual parts. We worked together in opposition to Bill 14, demonstrating a vital community that is prepared to fight for its institutions and the rights of its individual members. There were differences in approach, but the main message of opposition to Bill 14 was remarkably consistent and mutually supporting.

Read more…

Anglo-rights activists blast Quebec for new language bill

Sun News, QMI Agency, by Giuseppe Valiante

MONTREAL — The Quebec government claims to be listening to the concerns of anglophones regarding a new language bill, but its actions don’t reflect its words, two prominent Montreal anglo-rights activists say.

Brent Tyler, a prominent Montreal-based lawyer who often argues language cases, said Saturday that “the idea that the government’s (new law) was meant to benefit the English community is hypocrisy of the rankest order.”

[…]

Dan Lamoureux, president of an anglo-rights umbrella organization, told QMI that the ministers’ letter would have had more impact if it were also published in French newspapers.

“Politicians say one thing to the French community and another to the English,” Lamoureux said. “If you’re going to say it, say it to both communities the same way.”

Read more…

Anglo-rights activists blast Quebec for new language bill

Sun News, QMI Agency, Giuseppe Valiante

MONTREAL — The Quebec government claims to be listening to the concerns of anglophones regarding a new language bill, but its actions don’t reflect its words, two prominent Montreal anglo-rights activists say.

Brent Tyler, a prominent Montreal-based lawyer who often argues language cases, said Saturday that “the idea that the government’s (new law) was meant to benefit the English community is hypocrisy of the rankest order.”

[…]

Dan Lamoureux, president of an anglo-rights umbrella organization, told QMI that the ministers’ letter would have had more impact if it were also published in French newspapers.

“Politicians say one thing to the French community and another to the English,” Lamoureux said. “If you’re going to say it, say it to both communities the same way.”

Lire la suite…

Lettre de Lisée et De Courcy: Les anglophones ne sont pas rassurés

Journal de Montréal, Giuseppe Valiante

Le gouvernement du Québec n’a pas réussi à rassurer les anglophones du Québec en leur adressant une lettre ouverte pour expliquer le projet de loi 14, affirment deux activistes montréalais qui défendent les droits des anglophones.

L’avocat Brent Tyler et Dan Lamoureux, président du Quebec Community Groups Network, ont dit à l’Agence QMI, samedi, que le gouvernement Marois doit jeter aux poubelles la loi 14 s’il veut véritablement convaincre la communauté anglophone qu’elle est respectée.

La ministre responsable de la Charte de la langue française, Diane de Courcy, et le ministre responsable de la région de Montréal, Jean-François Lisée, ont publié une lettre dans le quotidien de langue anglaise, The Gazette vendredi, pour convaincre les anglophones que la nouvelle loi linguistique ne compromettrait pas leurs droits.

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