Tag Archive for: François Legault

‘Things must change in Quebec,’ says Legault ahead of inaugural speech

With Quebec now officially into an election year, Premier François Legault is set to deliver a new inaugural message Tuesday to the National Assembly, which he hopes will signal a fresh start for his government.

Launching a fresh session is useful for Legault. Any bills remaining on the order paper in the previous session automatically die, allowing him to cherry-pick the ones he wants to bring back and adopt. That will certainly include Bill 96, overhauling the Charter of the French Language .

On Monday, the Quebec Community Groups Network again urged the government to withdraw the bill and start over.

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Allison Hanes: For Legault, minority Quebecers are notwithstanding

Since winning power in 2018, Premier François Legault has become a much savvier leader, dialling down his divisive rhetoric from a few years back.

But that doesn’t mean he’s changed his stripes.

Now that he’s in charge, Legault is pretty much doing all the things he threatened to do when he was a raging populist, he’s just presenting it in a much more statesmanlike manner.

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Hanes: The devil is in the details of Bill 96 — and they are alarming

Quebec anglophones were bracing for the worst when Quebec Premier François Legault tabled his long-awaited bill to beef up protection for the French language last month.

But don’t be lulled into a false sense of security.

As Quebec anglophones know after 45 years of language wars: the devil is often in the details. And after an exhaustive analysis of Bill 96, the Quebec Community Groups Network has detected some potentially explosive landmines buried within the draft law that could have profound implications — not only for English-speaking Quebecers, but for other minority groups, fundamental rights and freedoms, and the very bedrock of Canadian democracy.

“Bill 96 also calls for the most sweeping use of human rights overrides in the history of Quebec and Canada, ousting the application of both the Quebec Charter of Human Rights and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms,” says QCGN President Marlene Jennings.

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Legault’s anglo liaison Christopher Skeete goes to bat for Bill 96

Despite concerns by anglophone interest groups over the possible infringement of freedoms and rights, Sainte-Rose MNA Christopher Skeete, Premier François Legault’s liaison to Quebec’s English-speaking community, is defending Bill 96, the CAQ government’s proposed new law updating the Charter of the French Language (Bill 101).

“The Quebec Community Groups Network deeply regrets that proposed changes to the Charter of the French Language override fundamental human rights and will erode the vitality of our English-speaking minority community,” the Montreal-based group said in a statement.

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EDITORIAL: Quebec’s Bill 96 reignites language issue

Quebec Premier Francois Legault’s claim that his province can unilaterally change Canada’s constitution to recognize Quebec as a nation and French as its only official and common language has suddenly become a lot more serious.

That’s because the support of the Canadian government would be needed to approve it and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appears to already be on side.

But Marlene Jennings, leader of the Quebec Community Groups Network, a coalition of Anglophone organizations, says Bill 96 sets a dangerous precedent.

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Robert Libman: It’s time to speak up, diplomatically, but with passion

Who is ready and willing to stick their neck out? Once the much anticipated legislation beefing up Bill 101 is tabled in the National Assembly, who will step up and represent the concerns of minority communities in Quebec?

Premier François Legault has already made it clear his Coalition Avenir Québec government won’t hesitate to use the notwithstanding clause, an admission that fundamental rights will be in play.

The Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) is the organization most likely be at the forefront as the debate heats up. Its president, former MP Marlene Jennings, sounds like she knows what’s coming. “I’m ready to rumble,” she has said. The school boards, anglo institutions, human rights lawyers and English media will all have important roles to play.

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Legault affirme que la CAQ tiendra toutes ses promesses électorales… et ça crée un malaise

Lors de sa conférence de presse du jour en compagnie du ministre de la Santé Christian Dubé et du directeur national de santé publique Horacio Arruda, le premier ministre du Québec en a profité pour annoncer aux Québécois que son gouvernement était «déterminé et convaincu» à respecter toutes les promesses électorales faites en 2018.

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Tom Mulcair: Diversity is a plus for all of Quebec, not a flaw

Quebec competes in an open North American market where businesses have choices. Legislating against minorities isn’t a great calling card.

Recently, Premier François Legault criticized Montreal for hiring Bochra Manaï as an anti-discrimination officer, because she opposed a discriminatory law, Bill 21. Someone tasked with fighting discrimination, who fights discrimination? Unacceptable!

It’s been a couple of long years on the human rights front here in La Belle Province, with religious minorities bearing the brunt of recent debates.

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2021 : Après la crise sanitaire, le débat identitaire ?

L’année qui s’achève aura permis à la population de tester la capacité de François Legault de gérer une pandémie. En 2021, il subira un autre genre de test, en pariant sur sa capacité à imposer l’usage du français dans toutes les sphères d’activité et dans tous les coins du Québec, à commencer par le centre-ville de Montréal.

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Nouvelle loi 101 en 2021: après la crise sanitaire, place à l’enjeu identitaire

Le gouvernement Legault semble fin prêt, en cette troisième année de mandat, à relancer le débat linguistique.

QUÉBEC — Si 2020 a été marquée par la crise sanitaire au Québec, l’année politique 2021 promet de raviver le débat identitaire.

L’année qui s’achève aura permis à la population de tester la capacité de François Legault de gérer une pandémie. En 2021, il subira un autre genre de test, en pariant sur sa capacité à imposer l’usage du français dans toutes les sphères d’activité et dans tous les coins du Québec, à commencer par le centre-ville de Montréal.

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