Tag Archive for: Eva Ludvig

Modernizing the Official Languages Act: how the feds got it wrong

The fundamental changes to the Official Languages Act proposed by Bill C-13 will have profound effects on the language rights of a great many Canadians, writes Eva Ludvig, QCGN interim president, along with Joan Fraser, former senator and member of the QCGN’s Executive Committee: “It’s time to stop, get back to basics, and return to the consensus achieved by the people the Official Languages Act affects the most.”

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Your minority vote matters

No matter how one-sided the voting intentions for the 2022 Quebec election may seem, it is important for everyone in the English-speaking community to get out and vote, says QCGN interim president Eva Ludvig. “We can’t give up,” she says: “If ever, this is the time to vote.”

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Les Québécois anglophones à la recherche d’une voix à l’Assemblée nationale

There is less than one month before the 2022 Quebec election and many of the province’s anglophone voters are still weighing their options. “When [Premier François] Legault was elected, he said that it was the government for all Quebecers and it seems that is not the reality,” says QCGN interim president Eva Ludvig: “Religious minorities, English-speaking minorities and immigrants are almost excluded and there is no plan to meet them and that’s a shame.”

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QCGN interim president reflects on action-packed mandate

QCGN interim president Eva Ludvig sits down with the Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph to discuss what has thus far been a packed mandate, as well as her vision for the future of the organization, and the upcoming provincial election.

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Quebec community groups say election will be “pivotal” for Anglophones

QCGN interim president Eva Ludvig speaks with CBC’s Sudha Krishnan about the recent report by Statistics Canada, showing some growth within Quebec’s English-speaking community, as well as the upcoming provincial election.

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QCGN Election Platform

QCGN interim president Eva Ludvig joins Global News’ Andrea Howick to discuss the organization’s platform for the Quebec election, and the questions it is posing to the provincial party leaders.

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New census data showing French ‘in danger’ spurs debate ahead of Quebec election

The vitality of the English-speaking community in Quebec should be celebrated, says QCGN interim president Eva Ludvig. “We don’t see ourselves as a threat to Quebec, we see ourselves as an ally to the French language — we support it, we learn it, we use it,” she says. “But just because we want our identity and our rights protected does not make us a threat.”

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Census shows slight decline of French-speakers in Quebec, reviving fears about the language’s survival

Though many are alarmed by the decline of the proportion of French-speakers in Canada reported in yesterday’s analysis by Statistics Canada, some in Quebec’s English-speaking community are pleased to see the proportion of Anglophones in Quebec on the rise. Between 2016 and 2021, the proportion of English-speaking Quebecers rose from 12 to 13 per cent. “For the English-speaking community, it’s good news,” says Eva Ludvig, interim president of the QCGN: “It’s reassuring: We are here, we are here to stay.”

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New Census data show Quebec’s Anglophone population making a recovery from the exodus of the 1970s and 80s

“It really is a celebration,” says QCGN interim president Eva Ludvig on the rise in the population of English-speaking Quebecers reported in an analysis by Statistics Canada, a sign of recovery from the exodus of the 1970s and 80s.

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Hanes: Coming election more important than ever for anglos: QCGN

It is more important than ever before for English-speaking Quebecers to get out and vote in the upcoming provincial election, says Eva Ludvig, interim president of the QCGN. Though some in the English-speaking community may be feeling discouraged after four years of “assault” from the Coalition Avenir Québec government, Ludvig continues: “There are about 40 ridings where there are a significant portion of English speakers and they do make a difference.”

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