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Dans Jacques-Cartier, on parle anglais: D-Tour électoral dans Jacques-Cartier

In the first of a series of pre-election articles, Le Devoir focuses on the predominantly English-speaking riding of Jacques-Cartier. QCGN President Geoffrey Chamber said all parties should support the Secretariat for Relations with English-Speaking Quebecers.

En prévision des élections, Le Devoir effectue une tournée qui le mène dans des circonscriptions aux prises avec des enjeux qui préoccupent tous les Québécois. Cinquième D-Tour électoral, cette fois dans Jacques-Cartier, dans l’Ouest-de-l’Île de Montréal, où se trouve la plus grande proportion d’anglophones au Québec.

Read more (in French)

Léger poll conducted for the Association of Canadian Studies and QCGN: Multiculturalism versus Interculturalism: Myth and Reality

June 27,  marks Canadian Multiculturalism Day. In Quebec, policy-makers and intellectuals have since the introduction of federal multicultural policy expressed much ambivalence about multiculturalism and over the since the 1990’s have insisted that Quebec rejects multiculturalism and rather promotes interculturalism. It suggests that interculturalism promotes interaction between communities in contrast with multiculturalism that purportedly promotes ethnic specificity. Presumably the intercultural model gives rise to divergent approaches to newcomer adaptation with a more integrationist and less accommodation of cultural difference. In this third part of the series on difference and similarity in views between Quebec francophone and anglophone we look at issues of immigration, diversity and accommodation. As we observe the results point to some of the sharpest differences in attitudes. They also reveal that the independent of linguistic background, Quebecers do not see much difference between multiculturalism and interculturalism despite years of insistence that the two purported models offer distinct messages.

The survey was conducted by the firm Leger Marketing for the Association for Canadian Studies and the Quebec Community Groups Network with a national sample 1226 Quebecers 871 francophones 275 anglophones and 106 allophones and was conducted between May 14 and may 17 2018 via web panel with a probabilistic margin of error of 3.5 points 19 times out of 20.

Click here to view the PowerPoint presentation

Léger poll conducted for the Assocation of Canadian Studies and QCGN: Quebecers Attachment to Canada: One year after the 150th

The weekend of July 1 2018, marks the 151st birthday of Canada and around the country there will be celebrations of Canada Day. Last year’s 150th anniversary of Confederation saw considerable commemorative activity around July 1 although participation in Quebec remained relatively lower profile than it elsewhere in the country. It’s difficult to assess the impact of the anniversary on attachment to Canada in Quebec or elsewhere though some surveys initially suggested a boost in such feeling. One year later the Association for Canadian Studies-QCGN-Léger Marketing survey points to a pattern of continued stability in levels of attachment to Canada on the part of Quebecers and a persistent gap between francophones and non-francophones in that regard.

The survey was conducted by the firm Léger Marketing for the Association for Canadian Studies and the Quebec Community Groups Network with a national sample 1226 Quebecers 871 francophones 275 anglophones and 106 allophones and was conducted between May 14th and  may 17th  2018 via web panel with a probabilistic margin of error of 3.5 points 19 times out of 20.

Click here to view complete PowerPoint presentation

Léger Poll conducted for the Association for Canadian Studies and the Quebec Community Groups Network: Attachment to Quebec and recent Historic Markers

Sunday, June 25 2018, marks the celebration of Quebec’s Fête nationale and in the second part of the series on English and French-speaking Quebecers we examine the respective degrees of attachment to Quebec and how they influence perceptions about language issues and the contribution of anglophones to Quebec society. We go on to examine which issues Quebecers feel have been the most important to our evolution over the past fifty years. Survey findings in this part of the study present important insights into Quebec identity.

The survey was conducted by the firm Léger Marketing for the Association for Canadian Studies and the Quebec Community Groups Network with a national sample 1226 Quebecers 871 francophones 275 anglophones and 106 allophones and was conducted between May 14th and  may 17th  2018 via web panel with a probabilistic margin of error of 3.5 points 19 times out of 20.

Click here to view complete PowerPoint presentation.

Bonjour/Hi: What French and English Quebecers Think About Each Other and About Key Issues PowerPoint presentation

PowerPoint presentation given by Jack Jedwab on English-speaking Quebecers in Evolution on Saturday, June 16 2018 at QCGN’s 23rd Annual General Meeting.

QCGN Vice-President Geoffrey Chambers interview on Breakfast Television

QCGN Vice-President was interviewed on Breakfast Television, to discuss revamped regulations that will ensure English-speaking Quebecers have a voice in the accessibility and quality of health and social services in their own language.

Watch full interview

Anglo groups cheer new federal spending to support official languages

The federal government’s announcement of $500 million in new spending for official-language minority communities was heartily welcomed by groups representing English-speaking communities in Quebec Wednesday.

The new spending brings the total investment of the federal government to $2.7 billion, the largest-ever commitment to official languages.

“The government of Canada has increased its investment in official languages by $500 million — a remarkable increase — and it has put English-speaking Quebec front and centre,” said James Shea, president of the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN), a coalition representing 56 English-language community organizations across Quebec.

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Anglo groups happy with support in budget for English-speaking Quebecers

The Quebec Community Groups Network says its members are happy Anglophones were mentioned in the 2018-2019 Quebec budget.

They say overall, they are pleased with the $25 million going to support English-speaking Quebecers.

Part of that money is going to scientific research, focused on anglophone communities, which the QCGN says is objective third-party research into minority issues.

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QCGN Welcomes New Federal Investments in English-speaking Quebec

Ottawa – March 28, 2018 – The Quebec Community Groups Network is looking forward to greater support from the federal government following the release of the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018-2023: Investing in our Future.

The plan, which includes $500 million in new spending for Official Language Minority Communities, was unveiled in Ottawa Wednesday by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Canadian Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly. These measures bring the total investment to $2.7 billion – the largest-ever commitment to official languages.

“Over the past several years, English-speaking Quebec has invested a great deal of time communicating its needs to the federal government,” said QCGN President James Shea. “With the release of the Government of Canada’s Action Plan, it is clear we have been listened to.”

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Quebec budget 2018: Will it affect you? Short answer: yes

Everyone is getting a slice of the pie in Quebec Finance Minister Carlos Leitao’s fifth and final budget before the Oct. 1 elections.

The ambitious budget is raining money on health care, education, small businesses and more.

There will be $24.5 million of Quebec’s economic plan over the next five years given to the Department for Relations with English-speaking Quebecers to ensure the “vitality” of the province’s anglophone community.

This comes after Leitao met with several anglophone group at the beginning of March as part of the consultation process for the budget, including Youth Employment Services (YES), the English Montreal School Board (EMSB) and the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN).

At the time, the QCGN insisted there was a need to establish committees to serve Montreal’s English hospitals and create organizations to act as access points for the English-speaking community.

 

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