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Celine Cooper: Let’s ensure age-friendly Montreal is inclusive

“The Plante administration recently announced that it will hold public consultations on its new Municipal Action Plan for Seniors 2018-2020. It has since been criticized (rightly, in my opinion) by two research organizations based at Concordia University for developing a plan using a process that excludes some of Montreal’s most vulnerable and marginalized seniors, including unilingual anglophones, immigrants and people with limited mobility.”

Celine Cooper argues that the Plante administration is not trying hard enough to reach Montreal’s most vulnerable in consultation on how to make Montreal more senior-friendly. Montreal Mayor Valérie Plante added a new English consultation meeting on Feb. 26 at the Cummings Centre, but the consultation website remains entirely in French.

While noting she was research project manager for a QCGN study, Cooper explains how Montreal’s English-speaking seniors do not form a uniform group and that they have needs and priorities that are unique and not like their French-speaking counterparts.

Read the article in the Montreal Gazette

Anglophone seniors don’t have language skills to get needed help: study

CTV Montreal

Anglophone senior citizens in Quebec say their limited language skills prevent them from fully participating in society and getting the help they need.

The Quebec Community Groups Network conducted the study by analyzing census data and surveying 835 anglophones across the province.

The three-year study showed 70 per cent of Quebec anglophones aged 55 and older did not think they had the language skills necessary to fully participate in society.

To read more…

Survey says French holding back older English-speaking Quebecers

By Tina Tenneriello, CJAD News

A survey among older English-speaking Quebecers across the province has found many feel boxed in because of limited French-language skills.

The Quebec Community Groups Network surveyed 835 English speaking Quebecers, 55 years and older, in eight regions across the province and only half spoke French.

Among respondents, 68.5 % said  they felt they couldn’t realise their full potential because of language barriers.  Those living in Laval, Montreal and the Outaouais were most likely to feel that way.

To read more…

Quebec seniors hit language barriers: survey

By Brenda Branswell, The Gazette

A survey of English-speaking seniors in Quebec found a large portion feel held back by their limited French skills.

That’s one of the findings in a report to be released Monday by the Quebec Community Groups Network, an umbrella organization for 41 English-speaking groups across the province.

The report includes a survey of 835 English-speaking Quebecers 55 years and older from eight administrative regions in the province including Montreal, the Eastern Townships and the Gaspé.

To read more…

Anglophone seniors don’t have language skills to get needed help: study

By CTV News Montreal

Anglophone senior citizens in Quebec say their limited language skills prevent them from fully participating in society and getting the help they need.

The Quebec Community Groups Network conducted the study by analyzing census data and surveying 835 anglophones across the province.

The three-year study showed 70 per cent of Quebec anglophones aged 55 and older did not think they had the language skills necessary to fully participate in society.

To read more…

QCGN launches most up-to-date, detailed portrait of Quebec’s English-speaking seniors

Montreal – October 6, 2014

The Quebec Community Groups Network today released the most up-to-date and detailed portrait of English-speaking seniors in Quebec. “Moving Forward – Building research capacity related to Quebec’s English speaking seniors”, which was supported by the Quebec English-Speaking Communities Research Network (QUESCREN) at Concordia University, presents the data collected during a three-year participatory research project where seniors helped define the topics of concern and carry out the research and disseminate the findings.

“Quebec’s English-speaking seniors represent 25.4 per cent of Quebec’s English-speaking community, yet they have been aging without the benefit of policies and programs that acknowledge their particular situation as a linguistic minority,” commented QCGN President Dan Lamoureux, noting this will be an important tool in advocating for seniors.

To read more…

English-speaking Seniors Unite to Create Provincial Voice

Montreal – November 19, 2013

English-speaking seniors, community partners, government officials from all government levels as well as the Commissioner of Official Languages gathered in Montreal today for the official launch of Seniors Action Quebec, a new provincial network for English-speaking seniors that plans to provide a provincial voice that will influence program and policy change to address the needs of Quebec’s English-speaking seniors.

“There are many issues confronting all seniors in Quebec, and especially English-speaking seniors who are uniquely affected because they are  less bilingual than younger generations and the fact that many of their children have moved away to pursue job opportunities or education,” said Seniors Action Quebec President David Cassidy. “This removes a major source of support for English-speaking seniors and means they must rely upon friends or government services to meet their needs.”

Read more…

QCGN/QUESCREN/SIRA Survey of Quebec’s English-speaking Seniors

As part of our three-year, multi-sited research project entitled “Building Research Capacity Related to Quebec’s English-speaking Seniors”, the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) in partnership with Quebec’s English-speaking Research Network (QUESCREN) is conducting a survey of English-speaking Quebecers aged 55 and over in order to learn more about their present situation.

You are eligible to fill out this survey if you:

  • Are 55 years of age or older
  • Consider yourself a member of the English speaking community in Quebec, regardless of what language(s) you speak. (In other words, even if English is your second or third language, do you prefer to receive your services – health care, government related information, etc. – in English rather than French?)
  • Reside full time in one of the following eight regions of Quebec: Capitale-Nationale, Estrie, Montreal, Outaouais, Gaspésie-îles-de-la-Madeleine, Laval, Laurentides, Montérégie

If you fit this profile, we invite you to fill out this survey and have your voice heard!Your survey answers will contribute to our collaborative efforts to build knowledge of the perceptions and experiences of English-speaking seniors across the province.

Participation in the survey is voluntary and you may withdraw at any time. Be assured that the anonymity of your response will be protected in any reporting of survey findings. Instructions are provided for each question. Contact information is indicated at the end of the survey if you have further questions.

To fill in the survey, click here.

Provincial Network for English-speaking seniors

”It was a very informative day” says Cheryl Henry-Leggo

The Gaspé Spec, Thierry Haroun

PERCÉ – More than 100 seniors and representatives from institutions and community groups from across Quebec gathered in Montreal recently to take the first important steps towards the creation of a provincial network for English-speaking seniors. SPEC spoke with Cheryl Henry-Leggo, Seniors Coordinator at Vision Gaspé-Percé Now. She was the only Gaspé representative at the Forum, hosted by the Quebec Community Groups Network.

Read more…

English-speaking seniors need their own network

The Chronicle-Telegraph

More than 100 seniors and representatives from institutions and community groups from across Quebec gathered in Montreal recently to take the first important steps towards the creation of a provincial network for English-speaking seniors. The forum, hosted by the Quebec Community Groups Network, was the result of a year and a half of work by a steering committee of 16 volunteers from across the province.

Read more…