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English-speaking Quebecers show high levels of distrust with Coalition Avenir Québec government

Montreal, Sept. 20, 2019 – A recent poll concludes that a strong majority of English-speaking Quebecers have far greater trust in their own institutions than in the Quebec government to address the concerns of Quebec’s English-speaking communities.

When asked who they trust more to ensure English-language services are provided to the public, including services in health, education, and employment, only eight per cent responded that they trust the Quebec government. A total of 78 per cent responded that they place their trust in community organizations to provide them with services in their first language.

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The SANB defends its agreement with the English-speaking Quebecers and the Franco-Ontarians

Société de l’Acadie New Brunswick President Robert Melanson does not regret his decision to partner with l’Assemblée de la Francophonie de l’Ontario and the Quebec Community Groups Network. There are distinct differences between the English- and French-speaking communities, but they also fight for a common cause, says Melanson.

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Clear linguistic divide on secularism revealed in Quebec: Poll

English-speaking Quebecers and other linguistic minority groups would be more open than French-speaking Quebecers when it comes to religious minorities according to a new Léger poll. More broadly, it highlights the presence of a clear linguistic divide on issues relating to secularism.

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Opinion: Quebec secretariat for anglophone relations is making a mark

It’s been a long road for the English-speaking community of Quebec since Bill 22 made French the official language of the province in 1974. Bill 101, two independence referendums and countless other events soon followed. The socio-linguistic context that has emerged has changed the English-speaking community of Quebec irrevocably.

Close to half a million anglophones have left the province, many of the community’s institutions have been assimilated or transformed, and the struggles with a host of socio-economic problems, ranging from adequate care for seniors to high rates of youth unemployment, have devitalized many communities.

I am among the many English-speaking Quebecers who understand that it was necessary to protect, preserve and promote the French language in Quebec, surrounded as it is by a sea of North American English. I just didn’t think that the English-speaking community in Quebec — my community — would end up paying such a steep price for that commitment.

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CTV Montreal Maya Johnson interviews QCGN President Geoffrey Chambers

CTV Montreal’s Maya Johnson sits down with QCGN President Geoffrey Chambers to discuss the upcoming provincial elections and the role of the English-speaking vote. Chambers vocalized the need for qualified English-speaking candidates who are sensitive to the needs of Quebec’s English-speaking community.

Watch interview

 

QCGN Advocates a More Community-Driven Process for Provincial Funding

Montreal – August 14, 2018 – The government of Quebec has committed $6.9 million over three years in funding to community groups across the province, but the Quebec Community Groups Network would like other vulnerable communities and populations to eventually benefit from similar support. An additional $4.9 million is also being made available to support other organizations providing services to English-speaking Quebecers.

“The money is considerably less than what the community requires, but who can be against our community getting much needed funding to support English-speaking Quebecers?” said QCGN President Geoffrey Chambers. “These are all deserving groups that are all doing excellent work in the community, but the allocation process was not transparent and the QCGN is concerned about how the remaining funds will be distributed.”

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Anglos have long list of grievances, Quebec document reveals on eve of Montreal forum

“With English-speaking Quebecers bluntly saying they feel like a “square peg in a round hole,” a cabinet minister says a plan to deal with the community’s frustration and angst will go beyond symbolism and offer concrete ideas to ensure its vitality.”

On the eve of a Montreal forum gathering minority English-language groups from across the province, the Minister responsible for relations with English-speaking Quebecers, Kathleen Weil, reported productive discussions about the future of the community during her visits of the past two months across the province. The list of grievances that has emerged: breaking the myth of wealthy privilege; increasing the number of English-speaking Quebecers within the Quebec public service; and others.

The Quebec Community Groups Network welcomed news of the forum and the promises, but said successive government have failed to act on those promises. Communications director Rita Legault said the QCGN is counting on the Minister to come up with an action plan that will make a real difference for English-speaking Quebecers.

Read the article in the Montreal Gazette

Anglo secretariat lauded, but underfunded

“The man tapped to head the Quebec government’s brand new secretariat for relations with English-speaking Quebecers, needs no introduction, as they say, to the community he is mandated to serve.”

The Minister responsible for Relations with English-Speaking Quebecers, Kathleen Weil, announced the creation of the Secretariat for relations with English-speaking Quebecers during a press conference held at the Morrin Centre on November 24. Weil also announced the nomination of William Floch to head the Secretariat, the public service equivalent of an assistant deputy minister.

One of the preoccupations stated by Warren Thomson, president of Voice of English-speaking Quebec, is the under-representation of English-speakers in the public service. The QCGN also released a statement where they expressed their disappointment at the budget of the new secretariat. It added a shot of politics to its reaction by jabbing the Coalition Avenir Québec leader François Legault.

Read the article on the Quebec’s Chronicle-Telegraph website

Anglophones more comfortable in Quebec, but will not fall into complacency

A feature in Le Devoir suggests that English-speaking Quebecers are becoming increasingly comfortable in their home province. However QCGN Director-General Sylvia Martin-Laforge says the minority community has concerns including recent health care reforms and the government’s decision to eliminate school board elections. Read more…

QCGN applauds Premier’s message of inclusion and diversity

Montreal, April 24, 2014 – 

The Quebec Community Groups Network was pleased with Premier Philippe Couilllard’s inclusive message during his swearing in ceremony Wednesday.

“We share the new Liberal Government’s vision of a Quebec whose citizens work together to make our home vital and prosperous, a vision we know to be a true reflection of our shared heritage, and sure path to a successful future,” said QCGN President Dan Lamoureux.

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