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English-speaking Quebecers Are Worried

Despite the Legault government’s reassuring message, many English-speaking communities in Quebec are concerned about alienation, writes Journalde Montréal columnist Antoine Robitaille. He notes that Geoffrey Chambers, president of the Quebec Community Groups Network, recently spoke about the detrimental effects of Bill 101 via Twitter.

Read more (in French only)

Francophones Outside Quebec: An Absurd Common Front

The situation of Francophones outside Quebec and English-speaking Quebecers cannot be compared argues Robert Dutrisac in an opinion piece forLe Devoir. Dutrisac was commenting on a memorandum of understanding between the Quebec Community Groups Network, l’Assemblée de la francophonie de l’Ontario (AFO) and the Société de l’Acadie du Nouveau-Brunswick (SANB).

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François Legault worries the English-speaking community

Many prominent members of the English-speaking community criticize difficult relations with the Legault government, saying it’s “disconnected”. At the heart of the problem lies a lack of empathy towards minorities. “It’s very very concerning”, says QCGN president, Geoffrey Chambers.

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School Transfers: Francophones are Standing in Solidarity with Quebec’s English-speaking community

French-speakers across the country are standing in solidarity with Quebec’s English-speaking community as the Legault government hastily begins transferring three EMSB schools to the Commission scolaire de la Pointe-de-l’Île. 

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Let’s Listen to the Interests of the English-Speaking Community

By Geoffrey Chambers, president of the Quebec Community Groups Network

The Commission scolaire English-Montréal (CSEM) received a formal 30-day notice from the Minister of Education, Jean-François Roberge, who plans to use his emergency powers to transfer three English schools to the Commission scolaire de la Pointe-de-l’Île even if the Education Act requires a 18-month consultation before closing or transferring a school. Nor the parents, the school community, or the English-speaking community have been consulted about the move.

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Macpherson: A call to ‘extinguish’ minority dissent in Quebec

A denunciation of members of minorities who complain of their treatment in Quebec as “enemies … of French-speaking Quebec.”

With it, a call to “extinguish these hotbeds of intolerance,” in a message the writer acknowledges might be used by the “hotheaded and violently prejudiced.”

Just another rant from someone in the online hate community hiding behind a pseudonym, exceptional only for its lack of spelling mistakes?

No, a column published in Quebec’s most-read daily and on its website, and promoted on the province’s most popular television network, all properties of Pierre Karl Péladeau’s Québecor media empire.

Even in Péladeau’s flagship Le Journal de Montréal, with its deep lineup of minority-baiting columnists, I can’t recall ever reading anything as disturbing as Denise Bombardier’s Jan. 5 column titled “Les québécophobes.”

You can read the column in French online at journaldemontreal.com/2019/01/05/les-quebecophobes, and form your own opinion of it.

You can also listen to Bombardier promote it on TVA television at tvanouvelles.ca/videos/5986318403001where she falsely accused Quebec anglophones of not supporting francophone minorities in the rest of Canada, such as the Franco-Ontarians affected by recent spending cuts by the Ford government. In fact, the Quebec Community Groups Network and the Montreal Gazette, among others, were quick to come to the Franco-Ontarians’ defence

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Young Anglos want to leave (FR)

“Frustrés et inquiets pour leur avenir, la moitié des jeunes anglophones du Québec estiment que leurs relations avec les francophones sont conflictuelles, au point où certains décident de quitter la province.”

Sixty per cent of young English-speaking Quebecers say they have considered leaving Quebec according to a new poll conducted by Léger for Journal de Montreal. Nearly half said they feel like relationships with francophones are tense and one out of three respondents believe those relationships will deteriorate. English-speaking youth also believe that Bill 101 should be softened, and they would like to see more bilingual signs and be greeted in both languages.

Read the main article in the Journal de Montréal

The Journal de Montréal dedicated much of its weekend editions to news and views about Quebec’s English-speaking minority community:

Bridging the Two Solitudes:

Une solution afin de réunir les deux solitudes

Plus riches, les anglos ? C’est désormais un mythe

 

Voters’ intention:

Frustrés, ils songent à délaisser le PLQ pour la CAQ

 

Youth and youth retention:

Ce qui agace les jeunes anglos

Son CV ignoré une centaine de fois

Anglophones de Québec : Quitter pour étudier dans sa langue

Le dernier anglophone à Irlande

 

Bill 101 and “Bonjour, Hi”:

Plusieurs anglos ont baissé les bras

La controverse du « bonjour, hi »

Le bilinguisme pas assez présent selon les anglos

 

Health:

Plus de 170 km pour être soigné en anglais

 

Education:

Le décrochage endémique à Stanstead

Des écoles menacées de fermeture

Fini, les batailles dans les cours d’écoles

 

Columnists:

Fatima Houda-Pépin : Les Anglo-Québécois : un rapprochement s’impose

Fatima Houda-Pépin  Ne touchez pas à la loi 101

Isabelle Maréchal: Anglos et francos : même combat

Le blogue des Spin Doctors : L’assimilation tranquille…

Denise Bombardier: Le Québec anglophobe!?

Richard Martineau : 1-800-SAVE-AN-ANGLO

Lise Ravary : Qui a peur des anglos ?

Claude Villeneuve : Tantôt minoritaires, tantôt majoritaires

Quebec’s next budget to address needs of anglophones: Weil

“Quebec’s minister responsible for anglophone issues is raising hopes that the concerns and needs of the province’s English-speaking communities will be tackled in a concrete way in Quebec’s next budget.”

Minister Kathleen Weil held an all-day forum at Concordia University to hear from about 40 leaders of groups and institutions that serve the English-speaking communities of Quebec. Weil told that the Liberal government intends to present a five-year action plan on issues they have brought to her attention in online consultations. She also said the new Secretariat will become a permanent part of the Quebec government.

QCGN President James Shea said Weil’s commitment is a real, true agreement to engage the English-speaking community. Sharlene Sullivan, executive director of the Neighbours Regional Association of Rouyn-Noranda said she is concerned about a “backlash” against the new-found attention English-speakers are getting from the government.

Read the article in the Montreal Gazette

QCGN Pledges Constructive, Positive Role in Process Launched Today by Premier

Montreal, June 1, 2017 – The initiative launched today by Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard – establishing a non-confrontational process of mature reflection allowing Quebec and Canada to more constructively frame our future as a nation – received a rapid, positive welcome from the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN).

QCGN steps forward to encourage and enable this dialogue and take a constructive role in the process, known as Quebecers: Our Way of Being Canadian / Québécois – notre façon d’être Canadien. We note that the premier’s announcement and its accompanying document is an important but preliminary step in what will inevitably be a complicated, challenging journey aimed at achieving consensus.

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Justin Trudeau conveys ‘sincere regrets’ for not answering in English

“In Valentine’s Day messages to Quebec anglophones, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau expressed “sincere regrets” for refusing to answer questions in English last month”

The incident dates back to January when Justin Trudeau answered in French to questions asked to him in English. Since then, several complaints were filed to the Commissioner of Official Languages.

However, Trudeau wrote a letter to the Quebec Community Groups Network on February 14 where he recognizes his wrongs and understands the importance to speak to minority language communities in their own language. He also wrote and apologized to the Townshippers’ Association.

Read the full article in the Montreal Gazette