Posts

A divisive history class – Repairing an error (FR)

“En gestation depuis deux ans, le nouveau cours Histoire du Québec et du Canada fait progressivement son entrée au secondaire. Les écoles qui veulent l’enseigner dès cette année peuvent le faire; mais il faudra attendre la rentrée 2017 avant que ce cours, axé sur les «particularités du parcours de la société québécoise», ne devienne obligatoire.”

In a two-part article in Le Soleil, education reporter Patricia Cloutier notes that while minor modifications have been made Quebec’s new history curriculum for Secondary 3 students, the changes have not addressed concerns of Quebec’s English-speaking communities. The QCGN notes the course is still not inclusive of Quebec’s minority communities that have contributed to the development of this province, especially English-speaking Quebecers, indigenous people and newcomers.

Read the first article in Le Soleil (in French)
Read the second article in Le Soleil (in French)

Discussing educational reform

QCGN Director Sylvia Martin-Laforge discusses the provincial government’s educational reform with CTV Montreal’s Mutsumi Takahashi. Watch video

Language Rights Support Program and partners including the QCGN produce newsletter on Education Rights

The Language Rights Support Program (LRSP) recently worked with the Quebec Community Groups Network and other educational partners including the Quebec Federation of Home and School Associations (QFHSA) and the Quebec English School Board Association (QESBA) the right to produce a newsletter on the right to education in English in Quebec. The mandate of the LRSP is the clarification and advancement of constitutional language rights in Canada and as such it has a significant role in educating the public about their rights.

Click here to read the Newsletter.

Brain drain, brain gain

The Gazette, David Johnston

Although the anglophone community of Quebec has started to grow again after four decades of decline, concerns about a brain drain continue.

The most recent study that looked at the education levels of “leavers” and “stayers” found a clear correlation between years of schooling and the likelihood of leaving Quebec.

The study, of 2001 census data, by researchers William Floch of the federal Heritage Department and sociologist Joanne Pocock of Carleton University, found two in every three Quebec-born anglos with master’s degrees were no longer living in Quebec in 2001. For Ph.D.s, the brain drain was equal to three in every four. Read more…