Posts

Alliance with Anglos of Quebec: The AFO missed the boat

Francophones in Ontario and Anglophones in Quebec should come together on pressing issues such as the modernization of the Official Languages Act and minority language education, but officializing the relationship goes too far, writes Sébastien Pierroz of ONfr.

Read more (In French)

Young Anglos want to leave (FR)

“Frustrés et inquiets pour leur avenir, la moitié des jeunes anglophones du Québec estiment que leurs relations avec les francophones sont conflictuelles, au point où certains décident de quitter la province.”

Sixty per cent of young English-speaking Quebecers say they have considered leaving Quebec according to a new poll conducted by Léger for Journal de Montreal. Nearly half said they feel like relationships with francophones are tense and one out of three respondents believe those relationships will deteriorate. English-speaking youth also believe that Bill 101 should be softened, and they would like to see more bilingual signs and be greeted in both languages.

Read the main article in the Journal de Montréal

The Journal de Montréal dedicated much of its weekend editions to news and views about Quebec’s English-speaking minority community:

Bridging the Two Solitudes:

Une solution afin de réunir les deux solitudes

Plus riches, les anglos ? C’est désormais un mythe

 

Voters’ intention:

Frustrés, ils songent à délaisser le PLQ pour la CAQ

 

Youth and youth retention:

Ce qui agace les jeunes anglos

Son CV ignoré une centaine de fois

Anglophones de Québec : Quitter pour étudier dans sa langue

Le dernier anglophone à Irlande

 

Bill 101 and “Bonjour, Hi”:

Plusieurs anglos ont baissé les bras

La controverse du « bonjour, hi »

Le bilinguisme pas assez présent selon les anglos

 

Health:

Plus de 170 km pour être soigné en anglais

 

Education:

Le décrochage endémique à Stanstead

Des écoles menacées de fermeture

Fini, les batailles dans les cours d’écoles

 

Columnists:

Fatima Houda-Pépin : Les Anglo-Québécois : un rapprochement s’impose

Fatima Houda-Pépin  Ne touchez pas à la loi 101

Isabelle Maréchal: Anglos et francos : même combat

Le blogue des Spin Doctors : L’assimilation tranquille…

Denise Bombardier: Le Québec anglophobe!?

Richard Martineau : 1-800-SAVE-AN-ANGLO

Lise Ravary : Qui a peur des anglos ?

Claude Villeneuve : Tantôt minoritaires, tantôt majoritaires

Controversy in Quebec as more French students choose English college

“Simon Berube loves Quebec, its culture, French language and people, but he and his parents decided the best thing he could do for his future was to enrol in one of the province’s English-language junior colleges.”

Many French-speaking Quebecers are choosing to attend Quebec’s English CEGEPs, a choice that could be revoked pending Parti Québécois’s win in 2018 elections.

Geoffrey Chambers, VP of the QCGN, says the English-speaking community of Quebec is used to have its institutions threatened by political parties, and this debate merely is identity politics.

Read the article in the National Post

Educational Institutions Must Tie Their Activities to the Vitality of the Communities They Serve

Montreal, September 21, 2016 – The Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) recognizes that schools are a cornerstone of the vitality of English-speaking communities and believes that Education Act should enhance the responsibility of our educational institutions to serve their communities.

In a brief submitted to the Committee on Culture and Education this week, the QCGN argues that school boards, schools, as well as adult and vocational centres must support the development and vitality of their respective communities. QCGN, which represents 48 groups across Quebec, insists that this responsibility should be clearly defined within the Education Act rather than being discretionary on the part of educational institutions.

Read more
Read our Brief on Bill 105

A divisive history class – Repairing an error (FR)

“En gestation depuis deux ans, le nouveau cours Histoire du Québec et du Canada fait progressivement son entrée au secondaire. Les écoles qui veulent l’enseigner dès cette année peuvent le faire; mais il faudra attendre la rentrée 2017 avant que ce cours, axé sur les «particularités du parcours de la société québécoise», ne devienne obligatoire.”

In a two-part article in Le Soleil, education reporter Patricia Cloutier notes that while minor modifications have been made Quebec’s new history curriculum for Secondary 3 students, the changes have not addressed concerns of Quebec’s English-speaking communities. The QCGN notes the course is still not inclusive of Quebec’s minority communities that have contributed to the development of this province, especially English-speaking Quebecers, indigenous people and newcomers.

Read the first article in Le Soleil (in French)
Read the second article in Le Soleil (in French)

Discussing educational reform

QCGN Director Sylvia Martin-Laforge discusses the provincial government’s educational reform with CTV Montreal’s Mutsumi Takahashi. Watch video

Language Rights Support Program and partners including the QCGN produce newsletter on Education Rights

The Language Rights Support Program (LRSP) recently worked with the Quebec Community Groups Network and other educational partners including the Quebec Federation of Home and School Associations (QFHSA) and the Quebec English School Board Association (QESBA) the right to produce a newsletter on the right to education in English in Quebec. The mandate of the LRSP is the clarification and advancement of constitutional language rights in Canada and as such it has a significant role in educating the public about their rights.

Click here to read the Newsletter.

Brain drain, brain gain

The Gazette, David Johnston

Although the anglophone community of Quebec has started to grow again after four decades of decline, concerns about a brain drain continue.

The most recent study that looked at the education levels of “leavers” and “stayers” found a clear correlation between years of schooling and the likelihood of leaving Quebec.

The study, of 2001 census data, by researchers William Floch of the federal Heritage Department and sociologist Joanne Pocock of Carleton University, found two in every three Quebec-born anglos with master’s degrees were no longer living in Quebec in 2001. For Ph.D.s, the brain drain was equal to three in every four. Read more…