Tag Archive for: Coalition Avenir Québec

Statement on Coalition Avenir Québec Government’s Refusal to Budge on Provisions for English-speaking CEGEP Students

MONTREAL, April 14, 2022 – English-speaking Quebecers are deeply disappointed that the Coalition Avenir Quebec (CAQ) government has refused to correct an ill-advised measure in Bill 96 that would impact the educational success of our youth.

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Opinion: CAQ’s message to English-speaking Quebecers seems loud and clear

Increasingly over the past few months, English-speaking Quebecers have been witnessing alarming signals.

Less than two months ago, the Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) government gutted the provincial committee responsible for advising the government on the delivery of health and social services to English-speaking Quebecers. It now seeks to replace the ousted members, presumably with others who may be more compliant. This has left in limbo regional access programs that list which services are available in English in any given region.

Without consulting our community, the CAQ cabinet last week appointed a new assistant deputy minister responsible for the English-language educational network as well as intercultural and Indigenous relations, the most senior bureaucrat responsible for services to English-speaking Quebecers. The candidate selected is a career civil servant with no evident knowledge of or experience in our English-language education network. Meanwhile, the Minister of Higher Education quashed a badly needed expansion of the campus of an overcrowded Dawson College.

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Anglos deplore CAQ’s naming of education deputy without consultations

The English education community is hopping mad that the Coalition Avenir Québec government has named a new assistant deputy minister responsible for the anglophone system without consulting it.

It’s the second time in two months the government has ruffled the feathers of the English-speaking community.

Earlier in January, the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) denounced the government’s decision to restructure the provincial access committee that for decades has been monitoring where, when and how health and social services are delivered to English-speakers across the province.

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L’offensive constitutionnelle du Québec divise le pays

Francophones and non-francophones are at odds over the Quebec government’s desire to amend the Constitution Act of 1867 to recognize the Quebec “nation” whose “official” and “common” language is French.

As many as 79.5% of francophones – but only 25.2% of non-francophones – “strongly” or “somewhat” agree that Quebec should be defined as a nation in the Canadian Constitution, according to a Leger poll commissioned by the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) and the Association for Canadian Studies.

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Le Hochet

Within hours of the Meech Lake Accord on April 30, 1987, an Angus Reid poll conducted for Maclean’s magazine showed that 51 per cent of Canadians from coast to coast were in favour, 27 per cent were opposed and 22 per cent were undecided.

Condemnation of Bill 96 and Quebec’s self-proclamation as a nation was immediate: while all political parties represented in the House of Commons have indicated their approval, 70% of Canadians outside Quebec are opposed, according to the Leger poll commissioned by the Quebec Community Groups Network and the Association for Canadian Studies.

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Bilingual municipalities call for ‘balance and ‘respect’ ahead of Quebec language reform

A group of suburban municipalities with bilingual status is calling for ‘balance’ and ‘respect’ ahead of major language reform set to be tabled in Quebec today.

Marlene Jennings, head of the Quebec Community Groups Network, or QCGN, said she finds it “very interesting” the bilingual status for some municipalities could change, given the CAQ’s stance, historically speaking.

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Only French should have official status as a minority language in Canada: CAQ

French should be the only language given official minority status in Canada, the Quebec government says.

In document sent to the federal government representing Quebec’s vision of the Official Languages Act, Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Sonia LeBel says French should be the only language recognized as needing to be protected and promoted across Canada, including Quebec.

Any modernization of the language act should take into consideration Quebec’s specific situation as the heart of the French language in North America, the document says, and Ottawa should thus think more of “equity than equality” in its future orientations.

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Quebec announces plans to strengthen French language laws

November 24, 2020 – Quebec’s Minister Responsible for the French Language, Simon Jolin-Barrette, announced on Tuesday a plan to table a bill aimed at strengthening French in the province.

“Quebec was born in French, and it will stay French,” Jolin-Barrette said at a news conference on Tuesday. Read more

Quebec language minister says changes to Bill 101 are not an attack on English

November 24, 2020 – The Coalition Avenir Québec government will soon make changes to Quebec’s French language charter. Simon Jolin-Barrette announced that he will table legislation to modify Bill 101 early in the new year. But as Gobal’s Raquel Fletcher reports, he has revealed few details of what that plan will actually look like, which is causing some anxiety in the English community. Read more

Opinion: Time for CAQ government to stop seeing anglos as a problem

Rather than picking fights with our community, we urge the Legault government to alter course, work with us, and cease defining us as a problem, writes QCGN President Geoffrey Chambers in this opinion piece for The Gazette. Chambers argues that today’s English-speaking community is invested in Quebec. We have encouraged and enabled our children to develop French-language skills. We accept and celebrate the predominance of French as the linguistic and cultural norm here. We don’t see ourselves, our language, or our culture as something bad that must be suppressed. Our community’s bilingualism is an asset to be celebrated — as multilingualism is applauded in any European country. Read more