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SANB joins Franco-Ontarians and English-speaking Quebec in coalition

New-Brunswick Acadians, English-speaking Quebecers and Franco-Ontario united their strengths. A historical memorandum of understanding was signed to defend the linguistic rights of official language minority communities. The Société de l’Acadie du Nouveau-Brunswick (SANB), the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN), and the Assemblée de la francophonie de l’Ontario (AFO) now form a coalition in the defense of linguistic rights.

Read more (In French)

Anglos, Francophones sign deal to work together on minority language rights

Quebec anglophones have banded together with francophones in New Brunswick and Ontario to protect and promote the rights of official minority language communities. The Société de l’Acadie du Nouveau-Brunswick, the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) and the l’Assemblée de la francophonie de l’Ontario called the partnership the first of its kind in Canada. At a news conference in Ottawa, the three groups said they have signed a memorandum of understanding to work together more closely despite the language divide.

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Acadian society joins Ontario, Quebec groups to promote minority language rights

The Société de l’Acadie du Nouveau-Brunswick, the Assemblée de la francophonie de l’Ontario and the Quebec Community Groups Network, signed a memorandum of understanding, pledging to work together to ensure the rights of linguistic minority groups.

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Trudeau also apologizes for his answer in French (FR)

“Quelques jours après s’être excusé pour sa réponse en français à Sherbrooke, le premier ministre Justin Trudeau a également adressé ses excuses à l’Assemblée de la francophonie de l’Ontario (AFO) pour une réponse en anglais à une question posée en français à Peterborough.”

After the incident which happened on January 13 in Peterborough, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau did the opposite in Sherbrooke a few days later. Following those two events, l’Assemblée de la francophonie de l’Ontario launched a letter campaign in partnership with the QCGN.

Trudeau apologized in a letter to AFO on February 23 saying he understood the importance for a Prime Minister to speak in minority communities in their own language. The letter campaign allowed to send 85 letters in French and 70 in English. Furthermore, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages also received about 60 complaints, which neither AFO, nor QCGN contributed as organizations.

Read the full article in ONfr – TFO website.

Read the letter and AFO’s comments