Venerable Atwater Library is one of city’s cultural treasures

The Gazette,  By Mike Boone

“You can peruse sonnets of Browning before returning to Cabot Square to enjoy a sherry.” It is probably the only place in Montreal – indeed, the only place in Canada – where a photo of Irving Layton is displayed in proximity to one of Sir John A. Macdonald.Other than the likelihood that neither was a stranger to the enchantments of scotch, the poet and the prime minister would seem to have little in common. But there they are, hanging out, literally, from a mobile suspended above the entrance foyer of the Atwater Library. Read more…

Advice for anglos: Stay optimistic

The Gazette, by Jan Ravensbergen

Across English-speaking Quebec these days, “the optimists have the upper hand” over pessimists, Graham Fraser, Canada’s commissioner of official languages, said yesterday in Montreal. He was speaking to a group of more than 80 people to help fill gaps in knowledge among the anglophone community. Read more…

Concordia launches English-Speaking Communities Research Network

Concordia University is pleased to announce today’s launch of the Quebec English-Speaking Communities Research Network (QUESCREN) in the presence of Canada’s Commissioner of Official Languages, Graham Fraser. “This dynamic network will be an alliance that will allow distinct research to truly flourish in Quebec’s English-speaking communities. The evolving nature of these communities makes the need for a research network all the more critical,” said Fraser. For the press release, click here.

Optimism on the rise, Quebec anglo told

The Gazette, by Jan Ravensbergen

MONTREAL – Within English-speaking Quebec these days, “the optimists have the upper hand,” Graham Fraser, Canada’s commissioner of official languages, said Friday […] He had departed from his prepared text to make the remarks about Sabia while speaking to a Montreal group linked with Concordia University and l’Université de Moncton. The group of more than 80 was celebrating the launch last October of the Quebec English-Speaking Communities Research Network, a fledgling network to connect academic researchers across the province. Read more…

Anglos warm to new cultural funding

The Gaspé Spec

MONTREAL – Organizations serving English-speaking Quebec say that a new national funding program for arts, culture and heritage has the potential to nurture a cultural renaissance among official language minority communities across the country. “Recognizing the value of arts, culture and heritage opens the door to exciting new ways of strenghthening Canada’s minority language communities,” said Guy Rodgers, president of the English Language Arts Network (ELAN) following lastweek’s announcement that Ottawa will spend $3.5 million a year to help and support and strenghthen the rich cultural, artistic, and heritage expression of francophone and anglophone minorities. Read more…

Anglos warm to new cultural funding

The Monitor, Toula Foscolos

Organizations serving English-speaking Quebec say that a new national funding program for arts, culture and heritage has the potential to nurture a cultural renaissance among official language minority communities across the country.

“Recognizing the value of arts, culture and heritage opens the door to exciting new ways of strengthening Canada’s minority language communities,” said Guy Rodgers, president of the English Language Arts Network (ELAN) following last week’s announcement that Ottawa will spend $3.5 million a year to help support and strengthen the rich cultural, artistic, and heritage expression of Francophone and Anglophone minorities.

[…] ELAN and QAHN have worked closely with the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) to come up with ideas on how this new fund can provide maximum impact and benefit for Canada’s minority language communities. These groups recently developed a joint policy framework that defines key areas of intervention over the next five years. The Arts, Culture and Heritage Policy Framework for English-speaking Quebec is available on www.qcgn.ca. Read more…

Anglos warm to new cultural funding

Organizations serving English-speaking Quebec say that a new national funding program for arts, culture and heritage has the potential to nurture a cultural renaissance among official language minority communities across the country. Full version…

Que.’s anglophones battling ‘brain drain’: Group

Canwest News Service, Mike De Souza

OTTAWA – English communities, institutions and services in Quebec have weakened over the past four decades, and are in need federal support to stop a brain drain, an umbrella group for the province’s anglophones said in Parliament on Monday.

”English-speaking Quebec faces the particular challenge of being a minority within a minority which, let’s face it, is not always recognized as such by key decision-makers and opinion-leaders,” said Robert Donnelly, president of the Quebec Community Groups Network at a Senate hearing on Canada’s official languages. ”The answer is not to divide the existing pie differently because the francophone minority is also in need of fair funding. We just need a bigger pie.” Read more…

QCGN appears before the Senate Standing Committee on Official Languages

If the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality is to be truly effective for the English-speaking community of Quebec, investments here will require a high level of commitment by politicians and policy and program architects. That was among the messages the Quebec Community Groups Network delivered to Senators on March 23, 2009. QCGN President Robert Donnelly and Director General Sylvia Martin-Laforge appeared before the Senate Standing Committee on Official Languages in Ottawa just after Senators heard from the Honourable James Moore, Minister of Heritage and Official Languages.  Donnelly also noted that federal institutions must find innovative ways of supporting our community. “While priorities apply nationally, policies can be adapted in such a way as to implement them differently in Quebec,” he said, noting there is a real appetite for change in the English-speaking community of Quebec.

Read the QCGN’s Brief to the Senate Committee here.

New program to defend minority language rights

Canwest News Service, Mike De Souza

OTTAWA – The Conservative government has told Canada’s English- and French-speaking minority communities it will create a watchdog panel to defend their language rights when ti launches a new $1.5-million legal support program, Canwest News Service has learned.

The new program, which would replace a court challenges program for minority rights that was scrapped by the Stephen Harper government in 2006, is expected to be up and running by the end of 2009. Officials from the Department of Canadian Heritage provided some of the details during a recent meeting with board members of an umbrella group representing Quebec’s anglophone population.

”The news is looking pretty interesting,” said Robert Donnelly, president of the Quebec Community Groups Network. ”The announcement will be made, we’re told, in the next few days.” Read more…