Weighing the impact of a Bill 101 reform – CTV News

Following a meeting with Language Minister Simon Jolin-Barrette, QCGN President Marlene Jennings discusses the impact that reinforcing the Charter of the French Language (Bill 101) could have on the community in an interview with CTV Montreal’s Maya Johnson.

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THE BIGGEST ANGLO GROUP IN QUEBEC HAS OPENED A DIALOGUE WITH MINISTER JOLIN BARRETTE. WHAT WENT ON DURING THIS CONVERSATION?

QCGN President Marlene Jennings went on CJAD 800 to discuss the recent meeting with Minister Simon Jolin-Barrette. During this meeting, QCGN representatives presented the concerns of English-speaking Quebec ahead of coming proposals to reinforce Bill 101. Without providing details of his plan, Minister Jolin-Barrette said he aims to protect and promote French while respecting the rights of the community.

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Marlene Jennings apologizes for backing premier in school spat

Marlene Jennings says she was wrong to back Premier François Legault when he suggested the English Montreal School Board was not qualified to decide about school openings and closings.

“When you are wrong, you are wrong!,” Jennings, head of the Quebec Community Groups Network, said in a tweet Thursday.

“And boy was I wrong to support Legault on school closures (or not).

“EMSB was right and I was wrong. I apologize unreservedly to EMSB. Full stop.”

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Anglo school boards hit back at Jennings for siding with Legault

QUEBEC — A war of words has erupted after Marlene Jennings, head of the Quebec Community Groups Network, sided with Premier François Legault over whether the English Montreal School Board is qualified to make decisions about re-opening schools.

“I love it!!!,” Jennings tweeted Wednesday after Legault questioned the EMSB’s decision to resist his government’s order to send older high school students back to class full time — an order the government soon rescinded.

Opinion: Canada’s official language minorities should have same rights

English-speaking Quebecers, and indeed all Canadians, should be wary of the consequences of the measures that are being considered.

In September’s speech from the throne, the federal government declared that “the defence of the rights of francophones outside Quebec, and the defence of the rights of the English minority within Quebec, is a priority for the government.”

The government’s recent policy paper, English and French: Towards a Substantive Equality of Official Languages in Canada, contradicts that commitment and represents a substantial shift in the treatment of official languages. Despite reassurances from Official Languages Minister Mélanie Joly, the government has put forward specific proposals that would provide rights to work and receive services in French — but not provide the equivalent in English.

Large consensus Around the Protection of the French Language

Eight of every 10 Quebecers surveyed consider that the French language needs to be protected in Quebec. Among non-francophones, 42 per cent agree.

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The OQLF gets a Significant Funding Increase… & What Sort of Money are Anglo Groups Getting?

(AUDIO) A significant increase starting next year in funding for French-language protection agencies forms an element of Quebec’s latest budget, note Marlene Jennings, president of the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN), and Liberal MNA Greg Kelley, Official Opposition critic for relations with English-speaking Quebecers. Both are guests on CJAD’s Montreal Now show to discuss changes in language funding announced in Thursday’s budget. The budget also includes a small increase in funding for Quebec’s English-speaking minority community.

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Wading Through Language Issues

(VIDEO) Kevin Shaar, constitutional lawyer at the Quebec Community Groups Network, talks about languages acts and different jurisdictions with CTV news anchor Mutsumi Takahashi.

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Montreal and special interest groups’ reactions mixed after Quebec budget

An unexpected area of funding was the $4 million for English-speaking Quebecers, money the Quebec Community Group Network (QCGN) expects to help get English speakers better access to government services.

“To gather actual statistical data that can be used to determine where the gaps are, where we need help,” said QCGN president Marlene Jennings.

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Opinion : Bilingual Juges… Almost

In this opinion piece by Patrice Garant, a public law professor, explains the principle of judicial independence mentioned by former Quebec Court Judge Claude Laporte in a recent article. M. Garant also supports the constitutional right Quebec citizens have to use either French or English in courts.