QCGN proposes paradigm shift in relations between English minority and French majority

The Main Street

In its brief to the Committee on Culture and Education looking at Bill 103, the Quebec Community Groups Network proposes a paradigm shift in the relations between the English minority and French majority in Quebec.

The QCGN is proposing two fundamental shifts in perspective to help Quebec society move through the social and economic challenges ahead, said QCGN President Linda Leith.  Read more…

Quebec must rethink its relationship with anglos

Le Bulletin d’Aylmer

It’s time for Quebec to rethink its relationship with its English-speaking minority.  That’s the message the Quebec Community Groups Network delivered to the general consultation and public hearing on Bill 103 being held this month in the National Assembly.

English-speaking Quebecers are not a threat to the majority.  Au contraire, we English-speaking Quebecers have made – and continue to make – enormous contributions to Quebec society in every wald of life, from education and business to health and agriculture, not to mention science, technology and the arts.  We are largely bilingual, and we strive to ensure our children are bilingual and bi-cultural. Far from being a threat, the English-speaking minority is an asset.  Read more…

Bill 103 endangers our rights

The Gazette

Last week, you published two related opinions: the Quebec Community Groups Network’s criticism of Bill 103, which made a case for recognition of the Quebec’s English-speaking minority community and the collective impact of adding an interpretive clause to Quebec’s Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms; and Michael Bergman’s analysis of the impact of the same bill on our individual rights and freedoms. Both articles reinforce each other, and the situation they describe is cause for concern.

There is a tension between the equally important interests of the collective, and protecting and ensuring individual rights and freedoms. In our society’s tradition, resolution of this tension tends to err on the side of the individual. The preamble to the provincial Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms makes clear that, “rights and freedoms of the human person are inseparable from the rights and freedoms of others and from the common well-being.”

Bergman correctly assesses that the changes that Bill 103 proposes to Quebec’s human-rights law are more than significant. They change the foundation of the individual’s relationship with the state. The effects will be most keenly felt by members of Quebec’s English-speaking minority population because members of minority groups are the most likely to need protection under human-rights regimes.

In its brief to the public hearings on Bill 103, Quebec’s Commission des droits de la personne urged the government to separate out those aspects of the bill proposing changes to the Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms, so that these amendments could be afforded the attention and debate that they deserve. This must happen if the citizens of Quebec hope to continue to possesses intrinsic rights and freedoms designed to ensure their individual protection and development.

Sylvia Martin-Laforge is Director General of the Quebec Community Groups Network



Time for Quebec to rethink relationship with English-speaking minority

The Sherbrooke Record

It’s time for Quebec to rethink its relationship with its English-speaking minority.  That’s the message the Quebec Community Groups Network delivered to the general consultation and public hearing on Bill 103 being held this month in the National Assembly.

English-speaking Quebecers are not a threat to the majority.  Au contraire, we English-speaking Quebecers have made – and continue to make – enormous contributions to Quebec society in every wald of life, from education and business to health and agriculture, not to mention science, technology and the arts.  We are largely bilingual, and we strive to ensure our children are bilingual and bi-cultural. Far from being a threat, the English-speaking minority is an asset.  Read more…

Proposition d’un virage dans les relations entre la minorité anglophone et la majorité francophone du Québec

The Equity

Québec – Dans son mémoire présenté à la Commission de la culture et de l’éducation sur le projet de loi 103, le Quebec Community Groups Network propose d’amorcer un virage dans les relations entre la minorité anglophone et la majorité francophone au Québec.  Le QCGN suggère deux changements de vision fondamentaux qui permettraient à la société québécoise de relever les défis sociaux et économique qui nous attendent, dit Linda Leith, présidente du QCGN. ”D’abord, nous proposons que la majorité francophone se reconnaisse en tant que majorité dominante et établie, et qu’elle assume plainement son pouvoir et la responsabilité de protéger la vitalité institutionnelle de ses minorités, incluant les communautés d’expression anglaise du Québec”, affirme-t-elle.  Read more…

QCGN proposes shift in relations between English minority and French majority

Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph

In its brief to the Committee on Culture and Education looking at Bill 103, the Quebec Community Groups Network proposes a paradigm shift in the relations between the English minority and French majority in Quebec.

The QCGN is proposing two fundamental shifts in perspective to help Quebec society move through the social and economic challenges ahead, said QCGN President Linda Leith.  Read more…

Paterson, Bolam and Walling honoured for contributions to English-speaking Quebec

Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph

The Quebec Community Groups Network is pleased to announce the winners of the second annual Sheila and Victor Goldbloom Distinguished Community Service Award which celebrates individuals who have gone above and beyond in contributing to the vitality and understanding of English-speaking Quebec. This year’s laureates are lawyer and longtime community volunter Alex Paterson, theatre icon Elsa Bolam and communivy advocate Richard Walling.  Read more…

QCGN proposes paradigm shift in relations beween English minority and French majority

The Gaspé Spec, Thierry Haroun

”Let us leave behin ‘us versus them’ thinking”

In its brief presented recently to the Committee on Culture and Education looking into Bill 103, the Quebec Community Groups Netwotk (QCGN) proposed a paradigm shift in the relations between the English minority and French majority i Quebec.  Facts and arguments with QCGN President Linda Leith.

The QCGN focused its presentation on proposed amendments to the Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms which, if enacted, would erode the vitality of Quebec’s English-speaking community. Read more…

Quebec should rethink its relationship with anglophones Bill 103 would be a good place to start this new outlook

The Montreal Gazette, Linda Leith

It’s time for Quebec to rethink its relationship with its English-speaking minority. That’s the message the Quebec Community Groups Network delivered to the National Assembly’s public hearings on Bill 103 this month.

English-speaking Quebecers are not a threat to the majority. Au contraire, English-speaking Quebecers have made -and continue to make -enormous contributions to Quebec society in every walk of life, from education and business to health and agriculture, not to mention science, technology and the arts. Anglophones are largely bilingual, and strive to ensure their children are bilingual and bicultural. Far from being a threat, the English-speaking minority is an asset. Read more…



QCGN awards two for contributions to strengthening English-speaking Quebec

The Sherbrooke Record

A former Bishop’s University chancellor, a theatre icon and a health care activist have been chosen to receive this year’s second annual Sheila and Victor Goldbloom Distinguished Community Service Award.

Named in honour of active citizens and volunteers Victor and Sheila Goldbloom – one of the few couples ever to receive both the Ordre national du Québec and the Order of Canada – the award was launched last fall by the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) to celebrate ”individuals who have gone above and beyond in contributing to the vitality and understanding of English-speaking Quebec”.  Read more…