English-speaking Seniors Form Provincial Advocacy Group

Press release

Thursday, March 29, 2012 – A provincial advocacy network for English-speaking seniors took another step forward as volunteers formed an executive committee that will work towards incorporation and finding sources of funding. The creation of the new group was announced during a community-wide priority setting conference in Montreal this weekend.

Under the motto: “For Seniors… By Seniors”, the group now christened as Seniors Action Quebec plans to provide a provincial voice that will influence program and policy change to address the needs of Quebec’s English-speaking seniors at a grassroots level. 

Read more…

To contact Seniors Action Quebec, email Ruth Pelletier at seniorsaction@qcgn.ca

For further information:
Rita Legault, QCGN Director of Communications, rita.legault@qcgn.ca
Office: 514 868-9044, ext. 223, Mobile: 514 912-6555
www.qcgn.ca   

Opinion: Inconvenient truths for Quebec anglophones

The Gazette, David Johnston, Communities Editor

MONTREAL – I heard a term I was unfamiliar with this past weekend in reference to anglos who have left Quebec: The Aways.

Come to think of it, it would make a great name for a band, like The Dears or The Stills or some of those other local indie bands whose collective influence in pop music prompted Spin magazine in 2005 to dub Montreal “the new Seattle.”

It was Kevin Erskine-Henry, a South Shore anglo community organizer, who used the term at the Quebec Community Group Network’s Strategic Priorities Forum in Montreal. The QCGN is the federally funded umbrella organization for anglo community groups in Quebec that replaced the old Alliance Quebec after it crashed and burned in the years after the emotional aftershocks of the 1995 referendum.

Read more…

Anglophone artists bridge linguistic divide Increasing francophone acceptance of English-language culture in province

The Gazette, Catherine Solyom

Call it the Arcade Fire effect – the idea that a band made up of two transplanted Texans, a woman of Haitian origin and four musicians from the Rest of Canada can be embraced by both anglophone and francophone Quebecers as one of their own, a symbol of Quebec culture to be proud of.

(Two days after the band won the 2011 Grammy for the best album of the year, even the National Assembly approved a motion saluting “the contribution of our francophone and anglophone artists in spreading our culture on the international stage.” )

For Guy Rodgers, the executive director of ELAN – the English Language Arts Network – the AF effect speaks to the vitality of English-language culture in Quebec, and the increasing, if uneasy, acceptance of it by the francophone majority.

Rodgers, a speaker at a forum for the English-speaking community held over the weekend in Montreal, said anglophone culture in Quebec has provided more success stories, with more prize-winning writers, musicians and filmmakers bridging the linguistic divide, in the last few years than in the last few decades.

Read more…

Débat linguistique: Anglos et francos s’accordent mieux

Journal de Montréal
Même si les deux solitudes commencent à « mieux se comprendre » au Québec, la minorité anglophone reste marquée comme « l’incarnation de la prédominance de l’anglais en Amérique du Nord ».
C’est du moins le constat de Victor Goldbloom, ancien commissaire aux langues officielles, contacté par le Journal hier en conclusion d’un congrès de trois jours du Quebec Community Groups Network.

 

English-speaking Community Sets Priorities at Conference

Sunday March 25, 2012 – More than 180 members of the English-speaking Community of Quebec from across the province took part in a community priority setting conference this weekend. The Conference concluded with the signing of a declaration that identifies priorities to ensure a vital and sustainable future. They are: Access to services in English; Community Building; Economic Prosperity; Identity and Renewal; Leadership and Representation; as well as Strong Institutions. To read the Declaration click here.

“The declaration distills these priorities to their very essence to ensure our community sees itself reflected in all of them,” said Noel Burke, chairman of the Priority Setting Steering Committee (PSSC), noting that individuals and organizations can attach themselves to these community-wide concerns when working with government and other partners.

Read more…

Culture helps bridge linguistic divide

The Gazette, Catheryne Solyom

MONTREAL – Call it the Arcade Fire effect – the idea that a band made up of two transplanted Texans, a woman of Haitian origin and four musicians from the Rest of Canada can be embraced by anglophone and francophone Quebecers alike as one of their own, a symbol of Quebec culture to be proud of.

(Two days after the band won the 2011 Grammy for the best album of the year, even the National Assembly approved a motion saluting “the contribution of our francophone and anglophone artists in spreading our culture on the international stage.” )

For Guy Rodgers, the executive director of ELAN – the English Language Arts Network, the AF effect speaks to the vitality of English-lguage culture in Quebec, and the increasing, if uneasy, acceptance of it by the francophone majority.

Rodgers, a speaker at a forum for the English-speaking community held over the weekend in Montreal, said anglophone culture in Quebec had provided more success stories, with more prize-winning writers, musicians and filmmakers bridging the linguistic divide in the last few years than in the last few decades.

Read more…

Editorial: Meeting the needs of English-speaking seniors

The Gazette

It is encouraging to see that a provincial government often rightly accused of taking near-blanket electoral support from anglophones for granted has come across with funding for a major initiative in aid of English-speaking seniors.

The minister responsible for seniors, Marguerite Blais, announced on the weekend that the Quebec Community Groups Network will be granted just shy of $275,000 to fund a three-year research undertaking that is projected to lead to the establishment of a provincewide advocacy network for anglophone seniors.

Such a group has been under discussion and its need evident for some time. French-speaking seniors outside Quebec already benefit from such an organization in the form of the Fédération des aînées et aînés francophones du Canada.

Read more…

Anglophone seniors seek a voice in Quebec Three-year research project: Community groups to split $5.8 million

Linda Gyulai, The Gazette

Quebec’s minister responsible for seniors, Marguerite Blais, announced Sunday that 73 community-based projects aimed at helping seniors become autonomous will split $5.8 million in Quebec government funding. Photograph by: Dave Sidaway , Gazette file photo MONTREAL – Quebec seniors need services and support to help them stay active and remain at home, and, if they’re English-speaking older Quebecers, they also need a voice in this province. That’s the premise of the Quebec Community Groups Network, an umbrella group of English-speaking community organizations that serve all age groups in the province. It will embark on a three-year research project to identify problems that inhibit access to government services, continuing education, housing, leisure activities and other types of services for Quebec’s 132,485 English-speakers over the age of 65.

Read more… 

QCGN offices moving soon

 

Quebec contest encourages youth to share heritage on film: Contest open to English speakers across the province

Nunatiaq News

A Quebec community organization is calling on English-speaking high school students in the province to share their heritage on film.

The Quebec Community Groups Network, which represents English-speaking groups across the province, has teamed up with CBC to sponsor a video contest to learn about the history and heritage youth across Quebec.

The My Quebec Roots Video Contest aims to highlight the stories of English-speaking communities across the province through pictures, sound and spoken word, while exploring communities’ traditions through family elders and oral history.

Read more…