Protect minority-anglo rights, Senate tells feds

Le Bulletin d’Aylmer, Julie Murray

According to a new report from the Senate Committee on Official Languages, the federal government is failing Quebec’s English-speaking minority and not living up to its obligations under the Official Languages Act. Based on public hearings and meetings in Ottawa and across Quebec, The Vitality of Quebec’s English-Speaking Communities: From Myth to Reality” concludes that Quebec anglophones don’t have adequate support from the federal government.

”The problem could stem from a lack of commitment to the English-speaking communities on the part of federal institutions within Quebec, a lack of consultations, absence of communications about existing federal programs, a poor fit between the policies of the province and the federal government, or a lack of transparency in the use of funds transferred from one government to the other,” says the report.

Read more…

Equal rights for anglos

The National Post, March 14, 2011

On March 9, the Senate Committee on Official Languages criticized the federal failure to protect English language rights in Quebec. According to a new report: “Despite all the goodwill there may be on the ground, there are major disparities when it comes to access to schools, cultural products, heritage, training or jobs in English.”

The committee heard many stories last fall of discrimination in services. Examples included the failure to build an auditorium at Quebec City’s only English CEGEP, a situation the director testified “would not be tolerated at a single francophone college in Quebec City.” A leader of a Gaspé anglophone group decried the lack of English mental-health services. The committee’s chair, Senator Maria Chaput, described similar problems as a franco Manitoban. Ironically, to hear many Quebec francophones tell it, it is French that needs bolstering -and protection from English. Fead more…



Time to abandon myths about anglos in Quebec

The Gazette, Editorial page

It remains to be seen whether the report on Quebec’s English-speaking minority released last week by the Senate’s official languages committee will make much of a difference, but it is a noble and welcome effort in aid of a community that is more typically either disdained or taken for granted.

Nearly two years in the making and backed by fact-finding visits to the main anglo population centres in the province, the report calls on the federal government to do a better job protecting the rights of the anglophone population. There was a time when such a call could reasonably have been dismissed as superfluous – and some still believe that to be the case. But the anglo population isn’t what it was in its heyday, which has been over for some decades now. Read more…



West Quebecers study future of Anglo communities in West Quebec

The West Quebec Post, Lily Ryan

Directors of the Regional Association of West Quebecers consulted a selection of their membership, February 23, in preparation for RAWQ’s long-term strategic plan. Moderated by planning facilitator Susan Grundy, fifteen members met the board at the Western Quebec Career Centre. The plan will map out where RAWQ’s resources should be directed to best support the vitality of the English-speaking communities across the Outaouais.

Heather Stronach, the Association’s manager, launched the discuttion asking participants to look ahead a few years at the evolving Anglo community’s needs. Discussion centered around RAWQ’s assistance to anglophones as they navigate French-language governmental services, including hospitals, municipalities, and provincial agencies.

Read more…

Feds must do more for Quebec’s Anglo rights; Senate report

Sherbrooke Record, Corrinna Pole

The perception of Quebec’s English speaking population needs to change and the federal government must do more to promote and protect its rights determined a Senate report that was released Thursday.

The 129-page report of the Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages, examined the various aspects of life for English speakers in the province, the challenges facing them and offered 16 recommendations to ensure their communities survival.

“We are trying to encourage people to make themselves and their problems known,” said Senator Maria Chaput who chaired the Committee. “(Anglophones) are a minority […] and we feel this report will give them the opportunity to say out loud what they need.” Read more…

QCGN President on Global News about the Senate Report

QCGN President Linda Leith was interviewed about the Senate Report on the English-speaking Community on Global News. Leith talked about the fact that the Senate report on anglophone rights in Quebec debunks myths about Anglophones being a privileged elite. She said the Senate also supported QCGN’s concerns about transparency in how Federeal funding is delivered to Quebec and how it reaches the English-speaking community for which it is earmarked.

http://www.globalmontreal.com/video/index.html?releasePID=wuRNttazNbG6oAIdjA2a0rckIKsg_bpR

QCGN President interviewed on Quebec AM about Senate Report

Protect language rights: Senate report Official Languages Committee; Aging anglophone population no longer privileged, lags behind francophones

The Gazette, Marian Scott

English-speaking Quebecers are no longer the privileged elite they were long considered to be, says a Senate report that calls on the federal government to do a better job of protecting the rights of the anglophone minority.

The 129-page report by the Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages paints a detailed picture of Quebec’s anglophones, an aging community that, despite higher-than-average levels of education, now lags behind the francophone majority for median income.

[…] Sylvia Martin-Laforge, executive director of the Quebec Community Groups Network, hailed the report for busting the myth that English-speaking Quebecers are an over-privileged minority. “The title tells the story and we have been wanting to tell the story about those myths,” she said. “We hope the 16 recommendations give leads to the government and the community for the way forward,” she added. Read more…

English-speaking communities in Quebec face challenges, Senate committee finds

IPolitics, Devon Black

In a new report released Wednesday, the Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages reported that English-speaking communities in Quebec face unique challenges in preserving their language within the majority Francophone province.

The report, entitled “The Vitality of Quebec’s English-Speaking Communities – From Myth to Reality”, used information from public hearings and informal testimony reported to the committee during the fall of 2010 in Ottawa and regions of Quebec. Its findings depict a nuanced view of a minority language community in a context that sometimes has little concern for English language preservation.

Read more…

Montréal, une ville bilingue?

Sylvia Martin-Laforge was interviewed by V Télé reporter to react to February 2 Gazette article
”Montreal is bilingual, poll finds”

Watch the interview by clicking on the thumbnail below.


Heritage Canada violated Languages Act: commissioner

Groups that relied on federal funding forced to deal with ‘many uncertainties’
The Gazette, Carmen Chai
 
Heritage Canada breached laws by delaying approval of funding and payments to organizations that represented official-language minorities across Canada, a report issued by the Official Languages Commissioner’s office showed.
Groups that relied on federal funding through Heritage Canada, such as the Quebec Community Groups Network and the Federation of Francophones of Newfoundland and Labrador, were forced to deal with “many uncertainties” because of the department’s funding delays, according to the official languages watchdog Graham Fraser. Read more…

QCGN Director General enthusiastic about bilingual exchange program

Interviewed last night on CTV News, Sylvia Martin-Laforge, Director General of the Quebec Community Groups Network, says that the new bilingual exchange program initiated by the Marianopolis College and the Collège Jean-de-Brébeuf will generate better language skills for the students who will participate in the program. 

”This is not about language politics. This is about providing Quebec’s young people with the skills they need to fully realise their economic potential here at home, and to give them the necessary tools to compete in the global marketplace. The more languages in which a person is literate, the better equipped they are to assist Quebec secure its financial future,” Sylvia Martin-Laforge said.

Watch the video here.

QCGN Director General on CTV News tonight at 6

The interview will discuss the impact of the newly created bilingual exchange program between the Marianopolis College and the Collège Jean-de-Brébeuf.

http://www.ctv.ca/nationalnews/

 

Anglophones polled to improve English media outlets

The Equity (Pontiac News), Andrea Cranfield

The Alliance of Official Languages Minority Media (AMM) in partnership with CBC-Radio-Canada and Canadian Heritage launched a survey called ”Let’s Talk Media” in October through Leger & Leger Marketing company to decipher the media habits of English-speaking minorities in Canada.  Rita Legault, the director of communications at the QCGN said they are really interested in knowing what the results of the survey are. ”There is a lot of English media that communities depend upon. Some do a great job but some don’t do a good job at all.  This is a major important resource for English speaking communities and their survival. And quality is of concern,” said Legault.  Read more…

Building bridges with literature

 
The Montreal Gazette, Lisa Fitterman

Linda Leith steps down as head of the Blue Metropolis festival at the end of the year. In a new book, she describes the festival’s creation and development.

The boy was tattooed, with lots of metal piercings and a prickly mien. No more than 15 years old, he was one in a class of high school students whose teacher had bought them to the Blue Metropolis literary festival to participate in a writing workshop. Watching him work, festival founder Linda Leith briefly wondered what he would make of the experience. Would he be inspired? Or would he disparage it to his friends, calling it yet another “bleeping” lame exercise foisted on him by adults?

[…] So she is on to other things, to finishing the novel she has been trying to write, travelling and continuing as the volunteer president of the Quebec Communities Group Network. She’ll also be back at Blue Met, maybe even volunteering alongside a young man whose tattoos and piercings once caught her eye and made her wonder. Read more…