Sun Youth: Sid & Earl parlayed one-time read into a humanitarian empire

“Life in the crowded Plateau Mont-Royal in the post-war years was a time of modest beginnings and big dreams, including those of a young Sidney Stavitsky, aka Sid Stevens, and his friend Earl De La Perralle.”

Sid & Earl’s Sun Youth first started with a local newspaper called the Clark Street Sun, and evolved to become the city’s first food bank in its headquarters in the former Baron Byng High School on St. Urbain. In tribute to their work, Sid and Earl are among the recipients of this year’s Sheila and Victor Goldbloom Distinguished Community Service Award, to be handed out by the Quebec Community Groups Network October 26.

Read the feature in the Senior Times

New secretariat for relations with English-speaking communities welcome by CAMI

“Dans la foulée du dernier remaniement ministériel du gouvernement de Philippe Couillard, la ministre Kathleen Weil hérite du nouveau secrétariat dédié aux Relations avec les communautés anglophones du Québec.”

In this radio interview to CFIM, Helena Burke, director general of the Council for Anglophone Magdalen Islanders (CAMI), presented her beliefs that the new Secretariat will help English-speaking minority communities, especially in isolated sectors, to access Quebec government services in their language.

The creation of a new Secretariat is an action sought by the Quebec Community Groups Network for a few years. It was suggested by Premier Philippe Couillard that its creation was forthcoming.

Listen to the interview on CFIM’s website (in French)

Kathleen Weil has long history of serving English-speaking Quebecers

“For Kathleen Weil, it was one of those ‘Mom would be proud’ moments of her life. The mother who made her daughter wear green ribbons in her hair to school on St. Patrick’s Day was very proud of her family’s Irish and Scottish roots, Weil said in an interview with the Montreal Gazette.”

Following the nomination of Kathleen Weil as minister responsible for relations with English-speaking Quebeckers, political columnist Philip Authier interviewed her to get a better sense of her expectations on the job. She had to defend her credentials to take on the job, especially since it’s the first time a Liberal government has created such a position.

Her past experiences as director of legal affairs at the now-defunct anglophone rights group Alliance Quebec was also mentioned. Geoffrey Chambers, vice-president of the QCGN, said it’s important for the English-speaking community to have someone that they can talk to.

Read the article on Montreal Gazette’s website

Quebec champion for English healthcare to be honoured

“Carter has devoted the last thirty years to championing the rights of English-speaking Quebecers to receive care in English”

CTV’s Caroline Van Vlaardingen interviews James Carter, winner of the 2017 Sheila and Victor Goldbloom Distinguished Community Service Award. Carter has been a tireless and effective advocate for improved access to health and social services in English in Quebec. Carter will receive his award at the QCGN’s Community Awards evening which takes place on October 26 at the St. James Club.

Watch the video made by CTV Montreal

Montreal woman recognized for leadership after near-fatal accident

“Later this month, Claudia Di Iorio will be honoured by the Quebec Community Groups Network for her leadership in road safety education and the work she’s done to enact change in Montreal.”

Seven years after being injured from a high-speed collision, she shared her story in the documentary “Dérapage”. She also served as spokesperson for the Cool Taxi initiative and now sits on the board of Quebec’s automobile insurance board (SAAQ). She’s been chosen for the QCGN’s third annual Young Quebecers Leading the Way Award to recognize and celebrate outstanding achievements of English-speaking Quebecers under 30.

Read her feature on CTV Montreal’s website

New Anglo Minister says changes to Bill 101 not forthcoming

“Quebec’s new minister for relations with anglo Quebecers says don’t expect her to spearhead changes to Quebec’s language law.”

Kathleen Weil spoke with Leslie Roberts on CJAD 800 on Thursday morning for the first time since being given the job in Wednesday’s cabinet shuffle.

Read the article on CJAD’s website

Cabinet shuffle: Couillard hopes fresh blood helps rejuvenate Liberals

“Premier Philippe Couillard’s Wednesday cabinet shuffle, designed to give the aging Liberal regime a mix of new youthful panache and sage management, is in reality a calculated attempt to put out the numerous brush fires endangering the Liberal brand.”

Quebec’s anglophone lobby, the QCGN, wanted a greater direct voice in decision-making. They now have a minister in the cabinet, Kathleen Weil. Although Couillard’s shuffle seems to be solving most problems he had during his mandate, it’s seen as a rejuvenated technique to boost on Quebecers’ desire for change.

One big news in the shuffle was Couillard’s decision to act on a promise he made and give the English-speaking community a greater voice in his government. The QCGN welcomed Weil as a “strong advocate” while former Equality Party Leader Robert Libman said it was nothing more than a symbolic gesture.

Read Philip Authier’s article in the Montreal Gazette

Kathleen Weil’s task is to mend disconnect between government and Anglo communities

“Kathleen Weil is calling her appointment as minister responsible for relations with English-speaking Quebecers ‘historic.’ “

Premier Philippe Couillard had already promised to create a secretariat to deal with English-speaking Quebecers’ issues. Now, following his latest cabinet shuffle, the government will have a minister dedicated to the task. Kathleen Weil, of Scottish-Irish descent, studied at McGill University. She said her office will relay concerns and priorities of Quebec’s English speakers to the government.

Community groups hope this cabinet shuffle means a fresh start in the province’s approach to the English-language minority. Michelle Eaton-Lusignan commented about the specific situation of the community while Helena Burke from CAMI asked to adapt programs to account for the realities of smaller communities. On Twitter, the QCGN welcomed and congratulated the new minister.

Read the article on CBC News website

Quebec premier names ‘historic’ anglophone affairs minister in cabinet shuffle

“When Philippe Couillard was aspiring to be Quebec Liberal leader, he and Kathleen Weil met with members of the province’s main English-speaking advocacy group to discuss its wish for a secretariat of anglophone affairs.”

Six years later, the Quebec Community Groups Network has what it wanted. James Shea, president of the QCGN, thinks it means the community has been listened to. For now, Weil is a minister without a department, but a secretariat is soon to be revealed.

The creation of a secretariat would be an historic step and will ensure a dedicated bureaucracy inside the civil service to work on behalf of English-speaking Quebecers. Sylvia Martin-Laforge hopes a couple dozen employees are hired, and would far outreach the Montreal-area. Helena Burke, head of CAMI, thinks that office would be important for the Madgalen Islands’ community.

Read the article in the National Post

Anglo affairs minister will be named in Quebec City cabinet shuffle

“Political shuffles are always a bit of a guessing game, but Premier Philippe Couillard has repeatedly said that he wants to bring “new blood” into the cabinet. “

Couillard’s minister shuffle is expected be younger, but also to included a minister responsible for anglophone affairs. Appointing an English-speaking Quebecer would give their population representation at the highest level of civil service. There are also talks that Couillard will create a secretariat on the subject.

The Quebec Community Groups Network says this is a promising development, welcoming the signal it sends to English-speaking Quebecers.

Read the article on CTV Montreal’s website

McGill and Montreal community honour life of Gretta Chambers, first female university chancellor

“Hundreds of people gathered at the Church of Saint-Léon-de-Westmount on Sept. 16 to honour the life and accomplishments of Gretta Chambers, former McGill Chancellor and beloved journalist, political commentator, and community builder.  Chambers passed away on Sept. 9 at St. Mary’s Hospital in Montreal due to a serious heart condition.”

In this tribute to Mrs. Chambers, Sylvia Martin-Laforge praises her deep understanding of national and international environment; an educator in the most holistic way. The article then follows in presenting her different accomplishments on the professional front, as journalist at the Montreal Gazette and as host at CFCF, as well as her community involvement.

Read the article in the McGill Tribune

French-speaking Canadians are waiting for Trudeau (FR)

“Les députés fédéraux reprennent le chemin de la Chambre des communes, ce lundi 18 septembre. La Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne (FCFA) du Canada prévoit un automne mouvementé et attend un geste de la part du premier ministre en matière de langues officielles.”

FCFA’s president, Jean Johnson, is asking for a meeting with Trudeau to talk about immigration and to meet with ministers. Johnson always awaits a new nomination for the next Commissioner of Official Languages.

NDP Critic on Official Languages, François Choquette, also is waiting this nomination following Madeleine Meilleur’s withdrawal. Choquette asked Minister Melanie Joly to make sure both the FCFA and QCGN are consulted on this matter.

Read the article on ONfr’s website

Allison Hanes: Ready for a reset at the MUHC

“The dust has settled since 10 independent members of the McGill University Health Centre’s board of directors quit in disgust two months ago, leaving a gaping hole in the governance of one of Montreal’s most important hospital networks and a major political problem for Quebec Health Minister Gaétan Barrette.”

After the mass resignation of 10 board members and a lukewarm explanation to the English-speaking community, Gaétan Barrette said he has a list of 20 candidates from which to strike a new board. However, Allison Hanes writes that it takes bravery for anyone to step up and fix the MUHC, especially after the tense and toxic relationship between Barrette and the last board.

The QCGN was caught in the crossfire when it was revealed they were working quietly behind the scenes to overhaul the board. She also hinted that Barrette should choose wisely MUHC board members so they have legitimacy in eyes of the English-speaking population, also that this new board should be a way to reset the situation in this institution.

Read the article in the Montreal Gazette

Anglo-Québécois en Exil – Report in La Presse+

“Ils sont instruits, entreprenants et souvent bilingues, et leur apport serait significatif pour la vie de la province. Le premier ministre Couillard leur fait déjà un appel du pied. Mais quelle place est-on prêt à leur laisser ? Le Québec est-il mûr pour le retour des anglophones ?”

Following Premier Philippe Couillard’s call towards English-speaking Quebecers outside Quebec, many members of the English-speaking community have applauded the initiative. This report published in La Presse+ suggests that many variables are ripe for to welcome English-speaking Quebecers which have exiled after 1980 and 1995 referendums.

Sylvia Martin-Laforge, QCGN director general, says there is something in Quebec’s zeitgeist that can only be seen as anecdotal for now. Nevertheless, she mentions Couillard’s call as an important gesture for the community’s well-being, even though many thinks it only is an electoral ploy.

Read the report in La Presse+

Parti Quebecois adopts measure to reduce English school funding

During CTV’s morning show Your Morning, Geoffrey Chambers, vice-president of the QCGN, and a Dawson College student, Simon Bérubé, discussed a measure that could limite English CEGEPs funding if the Parti Québécois is elected. Many reasons were put forward to limit the impact of its application, one of which would be its unconstitutionality. Furthermore, the French-speaking student explains that there is not much acceptance of such a measure since learning English allow young students to open themselves to the world.

Watch the interview below.