West Island MNA Geoffrey Kelley ‘reflecting’ on his political future

“After 24 years, I think I have the right to reflect to see whether I want to do this four more years,” he said. “But I love what I do.”

This comes after a report in La Presse that states Kelley is leaving politics to clear the field and allow the Liberals to unveil a new slate of candidates.

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It’s a date: English-language leaders’ debate confirmed for Sept. 17

For the first time in Quebec electoral history, there will be a televised English-language leaders’ debate. A date has been set for Monday, Sept. 17 — two weeks before Quebecers head to the polls on Oct. 1. The leaders of all four parties with seats in the National Assembly will take part in the 90-minute debate.

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What an English debate means for Anglo voters

QCGN’s vice-president Geoffrey Chambers joins CTV to give some insight into what will be a history-making chapter in this year’s general election.

Watch the interview

An English debate? Would that be great? Or something you’d hate?

All four party leaders have agreed to the idea of a debate before the Quebec election, in English.

Listen to the report on Radio Noon Montreal with Shawn Apel

If Chagnon steps down, Westmount-Saint-Louis voters want an Anglo to step up

People in the riding of Westmount-Saint-Louis are making plans should their MNA bow out of the next election: they want an Anglophone to run for the Liberals.

Current MNA Jacques Chagnon has hinted that he might not run again this fall.

If that’s the case, voters and Anglo rights groups say they want to see more representation in the National Assembly, where of 125 members, only three are Anglos.

“We do have to have somebody who is connected with the community,” said Geoffrey Chambers, vice-president of the Quebec Community Groups Network, which supports English groups in the community. “There are a variety of points of view in any party in any caucus and sometimes the people in the room don’t have as much information about the English community that they should have had.”

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Quebec awards $350,000 grant to Concordia, $600,000 to anglo groups

Concordia University has been awarded a $350,000 grant from the Quebec government’s secretariat for anglophone relations aimed at supporting “the vitality of Quebec’s English-speaking communities through research projects … conferences and outreach activities that connect educators, artists, community organizations and the provincial government.”

The funding will go to the university’s Quebec English-Speaking Communities Research Network (QUESCREN), which “provides opportunities to promote the understanding and vitality of Quebec’s English-language minority communities through research, training, knowledge mobilization, networking and outreach.”

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Liberals promise $950,000 to Anglo groups

The provincial government is promising to give five English groups $950,000 over the next two years.

Kathleen Weil, the minister responsible for Relations with English-Speaking Quebecers, made the announcement Monday at Concordia University.

She said the funding comes out of the Anglophone Secretariat’s budget, and will go toward expanding school programs, improving tourism, and more.

The English Language Arts Network, the Council for Anglophone Magdalen Islanders, and the other groups said they were happy with the funding increase, but acknowledged a certain level of cynicism after years of being taken for granted by political parties in Quebec.

Anglo Groups Getting Some Quebec Government Cash

Community organizations are starting to see some of the money budgeted for Quebec’s new Anglophone Affairs Secretariat with the minister responsible Kathleen Weil promising more to come.

Weil announced $950,000 over two years will go towards five groups that help support English-speaking communities in the province, specifically for projects to deal with issues raised during recent public consultations:

• $350,000 for Concordia University’s Quebec English-speaking Communities Research Network (QUESCREN);
• $230,000 for umbrella group Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN);
• $230,000 for English-Language Arts Network (ELAN)
• $80,000 for the Council for Anglophone Magdalen Islanders (CAMI);
• $60,000 for the Eastern Townships Resource Centre (ETRC).

 

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Improving access, quality of services

The Montreal Gazette
Saturday, April 14, 2018

Re: “Anglo panel sounds familiar” (Letters, April 13) In his letter, Robert Libman characterizes as unnecessary the revamped regulation announced by Health Minister Gaétan Barrette to oversee the creation of access plans that guarantee the delivery of health and social services in English to our community.

As a former MNA, Libman should know that rights obtained by Alliance Quebec in negotiations with the government in 1986 only guarantee services where plans are in place that actually define those services.

As a result of massive reforms in the health-care system, many of those plans are either out of date or out of service. Over the past few years, we have received frequent complaints about the lack of access to services in English, a recurring problem throughout the province.

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QCGN Vice-President Geoffrey Chambers interview on Breakfast Television

QCGN Vice-President was interviewed on Breakfast Television, to discuss revamped regulations that will ensure English-speaking Quebecers have a voice in the accessibility and quality of health and social services in their own language.

Watch full interview

Quebec to create committee overseeing anglos’ access to health services

It’s good to have screaming rights, but it’s better to have suing rights, lawyer Eric Maldoff joked following an announcement Monday that the government will create an official English-language committee responsible for maintaining access to health and social services.

Quebec Health Minister Gaétan Barrette and Kathleen Weil, the minister responsible for relations with English-speaking Quebecers, announced new regulations creating a provincial access committee.

Barrette said problems for English speakers in health care existed long before he enacted Bill 10, which abolished local boards at various institutions.

“I’m announcing a solution to a problem that already existed,” he said. “I understood that the community wanted to have a voice in one, clearly established way, through a provincial committee on access.”

How much money will be set aside for the committee will be made public at a later date, Barrette said.

Maldoff, who heads the Quebec Community Groups Network health and social services committee, praised Barrette for following through on a commitment.

Maldoff said the rights of English speakers cannot depend on the good will of the government.

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Quebec adopts new regulation to improve access to healthcare in English

Quebec’s health minister was at the Lakeshore General Hospital on Monday to unveil a new regulation that aims to improve access to healthcare for the province’s English-speaking minority.

The regulation creating a provincial access committee is the product of a three-year collaboration between English-language rights advocates and the health minister.

“At the end of the day, the only rights you ultimately have is if it’s written in an access plan you can sue on it because it’s a real right,” lawyer Eric Madoff said.

Maldoff heads the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) Health and Social Services Committee, one of the two groups who helped draft the new regulation.

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CTV News Interview with Eric Maldoff, QCGN Health and Social Services Committee Chair

QCGN Health and Social Services Committee Chair, Eric Maldoff, comments on newly revamped regulations that will ensure English-speaking Quebecers have a voice in the accessibility and quality of health and social services in their own language. The regulation was announced by Health Minister Gaétan Barrette, and Kathleen Weil, the Minister Responsible for Relations with English-speaking Quebecers on Monday.

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Improving access to health care for anglophones

Quebec Health Minister Gaétan Barrette has announced plans to adopt new regulation in the hopes of improving access to health care services for English-speaking Quebecers.

Global’s Anne Leclair reports.

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Government Sets Up Advisory Group to Assess Healthcare Needs for Quebec Anglos

Quebec’s English-speaking communities are one step closer to having more of a say on access to healthcare services in English.

The Quebec government announced that it’s greenlighted the creation of a revamped provincial advisory committee that will monitor healthcare services in English and provide recommendations on how what’s needed and where.

The revised committee was held up by the merger nearly three years ago of health care agencies overseeing services in different regions in the province.

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