Laval s’anglicise plus qu’ailleurs

Gabriel Béland, La Presse

L’anglicisation de Laval s’explique par l’attrait que cette ville suscite auprès des nouveaux arrivants. En fait, près de 40% des anglophones lavallois sont immigrés, selon une étude.

Oubliez l’image d’un Laval presque exclusivement francophone: la troisième ville du Québec s’anglicise. L’île Jésus serait même l’endroit dans la province où la population anglophone croît le plus rapidement, conclut une récente étude.

Selon les dernières données disponibles, le nombre d’anglophones a bondi de 35% en 10 ans à Laval. Il s’agit d’une progression trois fois plus rapide que celle de la population totale de la ville, qui a grimpé d’un peu plus de 11% entre 1996 et 2006. […]

Cette vitalité de la communauté anglophone à Laval ne surprend pas Linda Leith, présidente du Quebec Community Groups Network. «On sait que beaucoup de Montréalais quittent la ville pour la banlieue. Parmi eux, c’est certain qu’il y a des francophones et des allophones, mais aussi des anglophones», note Mme Leith, dont l’organisme rassemble 36 groupes communautaires anglophones. Selon elle, Laval se «montréalise», en quelque sorte. Version complète…





Laval s’anglicise plus qu’ailleurs

Gabriel Béland, La Presse

L’anglicisation de Laval s’explique par l’attrait que cette ville suscite auprès des nouveaux arrivants. En fait, près de 40% des anglophones lavallois sont immigrés, selon une étude.

Oubliez l’image d’un Laval presque exclusivement francophone: la troisième ville du Québec s’anglicise. L’île Jésus serait même l’endroit dans la province où la population anglophone croît le plus rapidement, conclut une récente étude.

Selon les dernières données disponibles, le nombre d’anglophones a bondi de 35% en 10 ans à Laval. Il s’agit d’une progression trois fois plus rapide que celle de la population totale de la ville, qui a grimpé d’un peu plus de 11% entre 1996 et 2006. […]

Cette vitalité de la communauté anglophone à Laval ne surprend pas Linda Leith, présidente du Quebec Community Groups Network. «On sait que beaucoup de Montréalais quittent la ville pour la banlieue. Parmi eux, c’est certain qu’il y a des francophones et des allophones, mais aussi des anglophones», note Mme Leith, dont l’organisme rassemble 36 groupes communautaires anglophones. Selon elle, Laval se «montréalise», en quelque sorte. Read more…





Immigration report to include English Quebec priorities

The West Quebec Post, Julie Murray

The Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) has announced that Quebec’s English-speaking community was consulted – and its concerns included – on a study of immigration by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages. The study looked at immigration as a development tool in official language minority communities. QCGN is particularly pleased with the study’s recommendation that Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) increase intergovernmental efforts to assess the English-speaking community’s needs and to financially support that community so it can develop its immigration network. Read more…

English Quebec’s priorities included in report on immigration

Thierry Haroun, The Gaspé Spec

”Gaspesians, Francophones and Anglophones alike are very welcoming to immigrants, ” says German born Thomas Martens.

PERCÉ – Attracting immigrants to the Québec regions, especially the Gaspé Coast is quite a challenge. Tools and financial incentives are needed to support this type of initiative. The Québec Community Groups Network (QCGN) made representations at the Federal level and its priorities have been heard.

”QCGN is pleased that Quebec’s English-speaking community was consulted and its concerns included in a House of Comons Standing Committee on Official Languages study of Immigration as a Development Tool in Official Language Minority Communities. The QCGN is especially satisfied with the recommendation that sugests Citizenship and Immigration Canada increase intergovernmental efforts to assess the needs of our community. This would provide it with financial support so that it can develop its immigration network, particularly in the regions, ” a recent press release published by the QCGN stated.

It’s also mentioned tht ”the Committee’s report notes that Citizenship and Immigration Canada should recognize that our community is a model of linguistic integration and that it recognize the specific role that our community plays in the integration of immigrants in the societies of Quebec and Canada, ” said QCGN Past-president Robert Donnelly […]

Read more…

Keep centre bilingual: lobby

Rehab facility’s status concerns anglo group

The Gazette, Philip Authier

A Montreal rehabilitation centre should be allowed to retain its bilingual status even if it does not have the required numbers under the law, a group representing English-speakers across Quebec says.

“If they were being generous about an institution that already had status, why would they not continue to give the new institution status?” said Sylvia Martin-Laforge, executive director of the Quebec Community Groups Network. Read more…



Priorities of English Quebec

The Gaspé Spec

The Quebec Community Groups Network is pleased that Quebec’s English-speaking community was consulted and its concerns included in a House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages study of Immigration as a Development Tool in Official Language Minority Communities. The QCGN is especially satisfied with the recommendation that suggests Citizenship and Immigration Canada increase intergovernmental efforts to assess the needs of our community and provide it with financial support so that it can develop its immigration network, particularly in the regions. Read more…

Priorities of English Quebec included in report on Immigration in Official Language Minority Communities

The Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph, Pierre Little

Montreal, December 2, 2010 – The Quebec Community Groups Network is pleased that Quebec’s English-speaking community was consulted and its concerns included in a House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages study of Immigration as a Development Tool in Official Language Minority Communities. The QCGN is especially satisfied with the recommendation that suggests Citizenship and Immigration Canada increase intergovernmental efforts to assess the needs of our community and provide it with financial support so that it can develop its immigration network, particularly in the regions. Read more…



Tele-Quebec French-Language Triathlon: The English-speaking Community after the Quiet Revolution

The French-language Triathlon is a competition for students in jounalism in Quebec. The competition takes place from October 18 to November 28, 2010 and from January 24 to March 6, 2011. In total, the teams will produce reports on six topics. All reports have to put their emphasis on the cultural and social nature of the French language.

The QCGN was asked to participate in an interview about the English-speaking community and its relationship with the French language after the Quiet Revolution in Quebec. Below is a link to the report created by Guillaume Jacob who participated in the contest in the ”future reporter” category.
http://triathlon.telequebec.tv/reportage/audio_les-traits-dunion_etape3.aspx#contenu

Goldbloom Awards

The Townships Outlet

What do Elsa Bolam, Richard Walling and Alex Paterson have in common today?
Besides decades of community advocacy between them, the three are newly-minted recipients of the Sheila and Victor Goldbloom Distinguished Community Service Award. 

The Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) launched the Goldbloom Awards in 2009 to recognize outstanding service in Quebec’s English-speaking community. Full version…

Language report stirs polarized reaction

By JAN RAVENSBERGEN, The Montreal Gazette

Hot on the heels of a federal report issued yesterday that said “far too many Canadians” can’t get federal services in the official language of their choice, the two solitudes spoke out -offering polar-opposite perspectives.  Help fix the problem by sharply boosting the number of anglophones in the federal public service within Quebec, advised Linda Leith, president of the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN). Read more…