French-speaking Canadians are waiting for Trudeau (FR)

“Les députés fédéraux reprennent le chemin de la Chambre des communes, ce lundi 18 septembre. La Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne (FCFA) du Canada prévoit un automne mouvementé et attend un geste de la part du premier ministre en matière de langues officielles.”

FCFA’s president, Jean Johnson, is asking for a meeting with Trudeau to talk about immigration and to meet with ministers. Johnson always awaits a new nomination for the next Commissioner of Official Languages.

NDP Critic on Official Languages, François Choquette, also is waiting this nomination following Madeleine Meilleur’s withdrawal. Choquette asked Minister Melanie Joly to make sure both the FCFA and QCGN are consulted on this matter.

Read the article on ONfr’s website

Allison Hanes: Ready for a reset at the MUHC

“The dust has settled since 10 independent members of the McGill University Health Centre’s board of directors quit in disgust two months ago, leaving a gaping hole in the governance of one of Montreal’s most important hospital networks and a major political problem for Quebec Health Minister Gaétan Barrette.”

After the mass resignation of 10 board members and a lukewarm explanation to the English-speaking community, Gaétan Barrette said he has a list of 20 candidates from which to strike a new board. However, Allison Hanes writes that it takes bravery for anyone to step up and fix the MUHC, especially after the tense and toxic relationship between Barrette and the last board.

The QCGN was caught in the crossfire when it was revealed they were working quietly behind the scenes to overhaul the board. She also hinted that Barrette should choose wisely MUHC board members so they have legitimacy in eyes of the English-speaking population, also that this new board should be a way to reset the situation in this institution.

Read the article in the Montreal Gazette

Trailblazing journalist Gretta Chambers bridged Quebec’s two solitudes

“As a journalist, a committed federalist and the first female chancellor of McGill University, Gretta Chambers was a multitasking trailblazer. Opinionated, forthright and gracious, this tiny, elegant woman bridged Quebec’s two solitudes effortlessly, explaining each group to the other – especially during turbulent times.”

This obituary written in the Globe and Mail celebrates Gretta Chambers’ many lifetime achievements. Michael Goldbloom, principal and vice-chancellor of Bishop’s University, praised her knowledge of both communities in Quebec, and reminisced about meeting her when attending Selwyn House at five years old.

It’s also where Michael met Geoffrey Chambers, now vice-president of the QCGN. Geoffrey also recounts the many great things Gretta has done for her son, from preparing meal for the entire football team, and the things she has done for her community.

Read the article in the Globe and Mail

 

Mayor Coderre wants to withdraw general Amherst name from Montreal (FR)

“Le sort du général Jeffery Amherst, commandant en chef des forces britanniques pendant la guerre de Conquête, revient à l’ordre du jour. Le maire de Montréal, Denis Coderre, confirme son intention de renommer la rue qui porte son nom.”

In addition to changing Montreal’s Coat of Arms and official flag, Mayor Coderre wishes to modify street names in the city, like Amherst street, to help with Indigenous reconciliation. Some members of the English-speaking community have agreed with this decision, including city councillor Marvin Rotrand.

He suggested that the City could bring back some names that were withdrew from the city’s streets. Rita Legault, director of communications at the QCGN, mentioned that Amherst named was contradictory to Quebec values, and she also said the city was lacking English names, but also names from Indigenous, women and other communities’ origin.

Read the article in the Huffington Post

Former McGill chancellor and prominent Montreal journalist Gretta Chambers dies at 90

“Gretta Chambers, the first female chancellor of McGill University and a prominent Montreal journalist for several decades, has died at the age of 90. She passed away Saturday morning at St. Mary’s Hospital in Montreal after undergoing treatment for a heart condition. “

Daughter of a French-speaking mother and an English-speaking father, she saw her role as a builder of bridges between Quebec’s divided communities. For this role, in 2012, she received a Goldbloom Award for distinguished community service.

Sylvia Martin-Laforge, director general of the QCGN, incensed Chambers’ accomplishments and said she embodied what was needed in Quebec to bridge both linguistic communities.

Read the article in the Montreal Gazette

Controversy in Quebec as more French students choose English college

“Simon Berube loves Quebec, its culture, French language and people, but he and his parents decided the best thing he could do for his future was to enrol in one of the province’s English-language junior colleges.”

Many French-speaking Quebecers are choosing to attend Quebec’s English CEGEPs, a choice that could be revoked pending Parti Québécois’s win in 2018 elections.

Geoffrey Chambers, VP of the QCGN, says the English-speaking community of Quebec is used to have its institutions threatened by political parties, and this debate merely is identity politics.

Read the article in the National Post

Gretta Chambers, journalist and former chancellor of McGill University, dead at 90

“Gretta Chambers, a prominent journalist and the first female chancellor of McGill University, passed away Saturday morning at the age of 90 at St. Mary’s hospital in Montreal. “

Born in 1927, and a graduate from McGill in policial science, she married former MP Egan Chambers who died in 1994. She was one of the first English-speaking journalist to write extensively about French-speaking Quebec before becoming the first female chancellor of McGill University.

Sylvia Martin-Laforge, DG of the QCGN, which awarded Chambers with a Goldbloom Award in 2012, said that Gretta was a pioneer and role model for women, and for the English-speaking community.

Read the article on CTV Montreal’s website

Chateauguay Toddler Can’t Get English Speech Therapy Via Local CLSC

“A Chateauguay mom will have to spends thousands of dollars a year and commute to Montreal to get private speech therapy for her young son because she was told she can’t get medicare-covered services in English close to home. “

A story sent to CJAD their community e-mail presents an injustice from a mother whose son has difficulty learning English. Even the waiting list for French services is 22 months long.

Geoffrey Chambers, vice-president of the QCGN, said it’s a tragic situation, but also a typical one in our healthcare system.

Read the article on CJAD’s website

Limits on English CEGEP financing may be necessary, Parti Québécois leader says

“Access to Quebec’s anglophone CEGEP system cannot be an “open bar,” and financial restrictions may be necessary in the future to protect French, Parti Québécois Leader Jean-François Lisée said Tuesday”

An amendment to a motion up for debate next weekend was brought forward by Eastern Townships PQ members. This measure would affect the anglophone system’s share of the pie by basing it on the community’s demographics.

Gerald Cutting, president of the Townshippers’ Association, said it’s clear the PQ is trying to find a way to accommodate party linguistic isolationists.

Read the article in the Montreal Gazette

PQ proposal: If elected, cut budgets to English CEGEPs

“As election years near, the Parti Quebecois has a tradition of playing to its hardline base. This time is no different.”

Quebec’s separatist party is considering cutting the budgets of English CEGEPs to stem the growing enrolment of French-speaking students. This measure follows a rejection from Lisée to extend Bill 101 to post-secondary education.

Commenting on the subject, QCGN DG Sylvia Martin-Laforge said that any coercive measure to an English CEGEP would only be detrimental to Quebec.

Read the article on Global Montreal’s website